VETERANS, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE — Woodworker makes military service plaques with his Woodmaster Drum Sander

Dennis Hogan's a volunteer on a mission. Returning from the Service in Vietnam, he felt vets weren't being respected. These days, he's saying "Thanks for your Service" with Service Plaques he makes with his Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Dennis Hogan’s a volunteer on a mission. Returning from the Service in Vietnam, he felt vets weren’t being respected. These days, he’s saying “Thanks for your Service” with Service Plaques he makes with his Woodmaster Drum Sander.

    More than a few Woodmaster owners have shared truly inspiring stories on our blogs. Here’s a powerful new story — a Washington woodworker who honors his fellow veterans with military plaques he makes with his Woodmaster Drum Sander.

“I was in construction for 25 years, then I was a machinist at Boeing Aircraft Company. I retired 13 years ago and have combined those two professions in woodworking.

Super-handy volunteer — the kind organizations love

Here's our man Joe Brennan, head of sales at Woodmaster. Joe was surprised and very pleased when he received the service plaque Dennis made for him.

Here’s our man Joe Brennan, head of sales at Woodmaster. Joe was surprised and very pleased when he received the service plaque Dennis made for him.

All the woodworking I do is volunteer. I can’t remember the last time I charged anyone anything. I do volunteer woodworking, remodeling, cabinetmaking, and more. I’ve done a lot of work building new display cabinets for the Costal Interpretive Center in Ocean Shores, WA.

I’m involved in the VFW, too. The local post acquired a 4,400 square foot building that needed extensive repair. And I built a 24’ x 36’ pavilion for our church last summer.

Deep appreciation for service veterans

But my special interest is making plaques for service veterans, WWII Vets especially. I served in Vietnam and when we all came home, it seemed like we weren’t very well respected. Times have changed but I started making these plaques as a way of showing appreciation for other veterans. They deserve it — they put their lives on the line for other Americans.

Honoring vets, Dennis has made hundreds of commemorative Service plaques. Each one takes him 8 hours or so.

Honoring vets, Dennis has made hundreds of commemorative Service plaques. Each one takes him 8 hours or so.

It’s amazing the stories that come up when I present a plaque to a vet. The stories come up and the tears come down. I find this work to be greatly satisfying.

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8 hours apiece

I use Eastern Ash for my plaques. It’s equivalent to oak but a lighter color. They start as glue-ups – I glue 2 to 4 boards into a blank 15” x 24”. The blanks start out about 1” thick and I dimension them down to 0.800 – a little more than 3/4” — on my Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Here's Dennis' "Ace hardware CNC router." Yes, he made it himself with parts from here and there and Ace Hardware. It obviously does a great job as you can see in the intricate bas relief carvings and engraving on his plaques.

Here’s Dennis’ “Ace hardware CNC router.” Yes, he made it himself with parts from here and there and Ace Hardware. It obviously does a great job as you can see in the intricate bas relief carvings and engraving on his plaques.

I engrave them with a CNC router I built. I call it my ‘ACE Hardware Special.’ I have templates for all the service branches — Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and so on. I engrave the soldier’s name, date going into the service, date leaving, where they were stationed — Vietnam, Korea, more. Often, I’ll engrave the name of a sailor’s ship on his plaque. Then I hand paint them. I give each one with a note of personal appreciation plus a letter explaining why I do this.

I’ve made about 200 of these plaques in the last 4 years, 7 or 8 a month. Each one takes about 8 hours.

Retired builder & machinist, he knows his way around drum sanders

I got my 26″ Woodmaster Drum Sander mostly to make these plaques. I’ve had different sanders through the years but I wanted to make better quality plaques so I looked to Woodmaster. I had a Grizzly® sander and it would burn up sandpaper if you used the wrong speed. It gouged the wood, too. And it wasn’t cheap when you consider the sandpaper I was going through.

Woodmaster had features I liked, like slow sanding speed. The drum turns at 700 rpm, I think, whereas imports run over 1,000 rpm, maybe 1,700 rpm. The imports’ fast speed heats the paper so it loads up and burns wood. That’s not a problem with Woodmaster. It’s very forgiving.

Self-feed plus reverse

Woodmaster, wow, you just put wood in at one end. It self-feeds through and it comes out the other end. A really nice feature is power reverse. I just run it back and forth, sanding both ways, maybe adjusting the sanding depth a little deeper with each forward or reverse pass. There’s no snipe. It does just a wonderful job.

Overhead plaqueBeing able to reverse the feed means I don’t have to walk back and forth, don’t have to carry a 10’ hardwood board from one end of the machine to the other.

Changing paper on imported sanders took me half an hour because you have to take the machine half apart. With Woodmaster’s hook-and-loop paper fastening system, paper changes take just a couple minutes. It’s no time at all to change from coarse, to medium, to fine, though I run 150 grit most of the time.

All today’s sanders are made in China except Woodmaster: USA

I was thinking I wanted a big, wide belt sander but the starting price is up to $7,000. I have a small shop and a small pocketbook! As far as I’m concerned, this Woodmaster does as good a job as a wide belt sander for far less money. There are lots of drum sanders on the market but all are made in China except this one. Woodmaster’s made in the USA and it isn’t any more expensive than imports.

I’m totally pleased with this sander. I’m on a learning curve but I’m pretty close to being up to speed. I had a question so I contacted Joe Brennan at Woodmaster. He got back to me within 20 minutes with the answer. I really like dealing with a company that has service after the sale. So many times these days, if you have a problem, a company will say it’s your fault and that’s it. Woodmaster doesn’t treat me that way — they work with me.

Talking to Joe, we chatted about the military. Back in ’66, I was on a mine sweeper in Vietnam. Turns out Joe was in the same squadron a couple years later. Small world.”

— Dennis Hogan, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, Ocean Shores WA

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TWIN SANDING DRUMS give this enterprising woodworker 3 SANDING OPTIONS IN 1 SETUP

Meet Edwin Miller, woodworker and Woodmaster Drum Sander owner.

Meet Edson Miller, woodworker and Woodmaster Drum Sander owner.

Frankly, it’s fascinating to talk with hands-on guys (gals, too) who are building, making, and doing really interesting projects. We spoke recently with Edson Miller, woodworker, from Idaho. He tells us he “dabbled in woodworking” all his life. Looks like he’s moved well beyond that. Today, he’s got a healthy and thriving woodworking business.

And Edson’s discovered the little-known ‘hidden talent’ of his Woodmaster double-drum sander — 3 sanding options with 1 setup…….

Bet you haven't seen a Facebook page like Edwin's. He's posted dozens, dozens, and dozens of photos of his work. This is one busy woodworker!

Bet you haven’t seen a Facebook page like Edson’s. He’s posted dozens, dozens, and dozens of photos of his work. This is one busy woodworker!

“I got started woodworking as a young boy. My dad bought me some woodworking tools, a jigsaw. I got more tools over time, of course, and I’ve been dabbling in woodworking all these years. In the last few years, I started watching woodworking videos and reading woodworking magazines and got inspired to start serious woodworking.

I got my Woodmaster Planer in 2007 or so, then my Woodmaster Drum Sander in 2010. Later, I bought one of your dust collectors and I wouldn’t work without it.

I started making molding and made enough to pay for the Planer. I did quite well, actually, working part time. Meanwhile, I ran various businesses — a seamless gutter business, lawn care and maintenance businesses. About that time, we built a house and I made all the trim with poplar that came from my wife’s cousin who had a sawmill.

Here's a sample of the output from Mr. Miller's double-drum Woodmaster Drum Sander. Smooth as a baby's bottom!

Here’s a sample of the output from Mr. Miller’s double-drum Woodmaster Drum Sander. Smooth as a baby’s bottom!

Sander 80% faster than hand sanding…better, too

By the 2010, I was making custom furniture and I realized I could save sanding time with your 38” double drum sander. I use it to prep materials for bunk beds, Adirondack furniture, desk, tables, and other furniture I make. It’s worked out very well.

I make both ‘fine’ and ‘rustic’ furniture, a nice variety. I purchase rough or semi-rough lumber — oak, hickory, whatever. The thickness can be inconsistent. Some boards are thicker than others and rather than sand them all to the same thickness, I started planing every board with my Woodmaster Planer. I do both sides, down to 1-3/8” for example.

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I got Woodmaster’s 38” Drum Sander 3875-X2 because I’d rather go a little bigger than I need and it’s paid off handsomely. For example the desks I build get pretty wide and I’ve never regretted having a 38” machine.

Edwin told us this picture is "a couple of grandkids enjoying fine furniture." Cute.

Edson told us this picture is “a couple of grandkids enjoying fine furniture.” Cute.

Picnic Table1 setup, 2 drums, 3 sanding options

Double drums - that's 2 drums, side by side. 3 sanding options: 1) Sand with 1 drum, 2) or the second drum 3) or BOTH drums for primary and secondary sanding in a single pass.

Double drums – that’s 2 drums, side by side. 3 sanding options: 1) Sand with 1 drum, 2) or the second drum 3) or BOTH drums for primary and secondary sanding in a single pass.

And the double drum? I wouldn’t want to go any other way. Here’s how I use the two drums. I put coarser, 100-grit sandpaper on the first drum at the ‘feed’ end of the machine. And I put finer, 180-grit paper on the second drum at the ‘exit’ end.

I can run wood through both drums in one pass. Or, when I want to, I can raise the finer-grit first drum out of the way and run wood through just the coarser-grit drum. Using the machine’s reverse, I can bring the wood back to me and feed it back and forth to dimension it. When I get it to the thickness I want, I lower the finer-grit drum back down.

Both drums can go up and down – actually, it’s the table that goes up and down but the effect is that you can sand with one drum, the other drum, or both drums.

Here's one of Edwin's elaborate, "double decker" bunk beds. Might just make kids (and parents) look forward to bedtime.

Here’s one of Edson’s elaborate, “double decker” bunk beds. Might just make kids (and parents) look forward to bedtime.

All that gives me quite a bit of sanding leeway. The primary advantage is you can do primary and secondary sanding in one pass. It’s so smooth it’s amazing. And it’s a huge time saver — I save at least 80% of the time it takes to hand sand. And then of course you can sand with just fine, just coarse, or both fine and coarse in the same pass.

(Editor’s Note: Readers, Woodmaster’s 3-way sanding option is totally unique. No other double-drum sander can sand with one drum, OR the other drum, OR both drums. More info? Contact us.)

Mr. Miller's got a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too. But that's another story, for another post on the Woodmaster Planer blog!

Mr. Miller’s got a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too. But that’s another story, for another post on the Woodmaster Planer blog!

Awesome quality

I’ve never regretted purchasing my Woodmaster machines. Both have worked very well and have been trouble free. They do awesome quality work. They don’t make trouble, they just work!”

— Edson Miller, Magic Valley Woodworks, Gooding ID — Woodmaster Drum Sander & Molder/Planer Owner

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DON’T ASK CAROLINE if her wood order is for her husband!

Caroline Can Do It!

DSC04621Caroline Spurgeon is an accomplished craftswoman from Colorado. She’s been a hand-weaver for decades, then stepped up her game by designing, building, and selling her own weaving looms. She recently sold the loom manufacturing business she built and devotes her considerable woodworking talents to making one-of-a-kind projects with her Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Caroline told us, "I designed my looms to make Navajo-style miniature rugs. I have always loved the designs found in Navajo rugs and started weaving them in the 1970’s. Now my looms are used for any tapestry style weavings." The looms come in three sizes. The smallest is 12” x 15". The medium is 17” x 22” and the large is 27” x 30. I’ve made them in a variety of woods. The ones pictured are walnut, African padauk, and bird’s eye maple.

Caroline told us, “I designed my looms to make Navajo-style miniature rugs. I have always loved the designs found in Navajo rugs and started weaving them in the 1970’s. Now my looms are used for any tapestry style weavings.” The looms come in three sizes. The smallest is 12” x 15″. The medium is 17” x 22” and the large is 27” x 30. I’ve made them in a variety of woods. The ones pictured are walnut, African padauk, and bird’s eye maple.

“I’ve always loved the designs found in hand-woven, Navajo-style rugs. I began weaving them myself, full size, in the 1970’s. Over the years, I designed and built looms to weave miniature Navajo-design rugs.

3,000 looms

Woodworking runs in my family. My grandfather was a master woodworker. I inherited his tools including his 1954 Craftsman table saw. I always did woodworking as a hobby, then I went into full-time, production woodworking 16 years ago. I built and sold over 3,000 of my looms in that time! I sold my loom-making business recently and now I can devote my time to more creative woodworking projects. You can see my looms at the website I built for my business.

These days, I’m making one-of-a-kind jewelry boxes, benches, heirloom cradles, and more. Currently, I’m making the cabinets for one of my son’s homes. Production work is great but you have to continually produce. Now, in semi-retirement, I’m building things that are more fun and more creative.

"My large jewelry box with all the drawers is walnut and maple. It is 14” x 10” x 20” high. The smaller one is 14” x 10” x 6” and is made of walnut and oak with crushed turquoise inlay."

“My large jewelry box with all the drawers is walnut and maple. It is 14” x 10” x 20” high. The smaller one is 14” x 10” x 6” and is made of walnut and oak with crushed turquoise inlay.”

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Sand before ripping

Navajo weaver, Jennie Slick (right), teaches students Navajo-style weaving using Caroline's handmade looms.

Navajo weaver, Jennie Slick (right), teaches students Navajo-style weaving using Caroline’s handmade looms.

I got a Woodmaster Drum Sander because I do a lot of sanding. Hand sanding is really labor intensive; sanding with the Woodmaster cuts my sanding time at least in half. For my looms, I sanded boards on all four sides. I’d sand boards before I ripped them to the right width — it really reduced my work greatly and created a very consistent, even surface.

Also, sanding with the Woodmaster also saves wear and tear on the body. I wish I’d gotten one about 10 years earlier! Physically, it’s really easy to use. It couldn’t be simpler. There’s only an on/off switch and the handle to raise and lower the bed. It’s easy to use, it’s made in the USA, and the folks at Woodmaster have always been very helpful. I think this machine is the best on the market.

I had a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too, but I just sold it since I’m not doing production work any more. It was a fast sale — I put it on Ebay and got $48 more than I paid for it!”

— Caroline Spurgeon, craftswoman & Woodmaster Owner, Colorado

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WOODWORKER CREATES BEAUTIFUL MUSIC

"I made this jumbo-body guitar from Flamed Honduran mahogany with rosewood binding," says John.

“I made this jumbo-body guitar from Flamed Honduran mahogany with rosewood binding,” says John.

"This guitar has a Sitka spruce top," John tells us. "I trimmed the sound hold with Abalone shell."

“This guitar has a Sitka spruce top,” John tells us. “I trimmed the sound hold with Abalone shell.”

John Mannino is a skilled, self-taught Pennsylvania artisan who builds high quality acoustic guitars. “I always wanted to make guitars,” he told us. “I want to make as many as I can, of the highest quality I can.”

"Here's a detail of a sound port on a dreadnaught-style guitar I made of local walnut with paduk trim."

“Here’s a detail of a sound port on a dreadnaught-style guitar I made of local walnut with paduk trim.”

“I worked in construction for many years, hanging drywall and painting. I injured my back it gave me time to try what I’d always wanted to do, build acoustic guitars. Growing up, a friend’s father made violins. Maybe that inspired me.

Trial and error, and error, and error

I started making guitars about 14 years ago. I bought cheap equipment — a bandsaw, jointer, drill press, and so on at Lowe’s. I got a book on building guitars and started on this journey. I’m completely self-taught. I call it trial and error, and error, and error! It’s taken me a long time but my instruments are getting better and better. I’m getting good reactions from musicians.

Of course I play guitar myself — folk music, blues, jazz. A little bit of everything. But I don’t get that much time to play. I’m in the shop building guitars eight or ten hours a day. This is an avocation, something I want to do. And building quality guitars is a real challenge.

John makes them light and strong

Here's John with one of many guitars he's made, and the Woodmaster Drum Sander he uses to make them.

Here’s John with one of many guitars he’s made, and the Woodmaster Drum Sander he uses to make them.

Flamed Hondouran mahogany guitar with Sitka spruce top.

Flamed Hondouran mahogany guitar with Sitka spruce top.

Unlike an electric guitar, you have to build the sound into an acoustic guitar. You really have to know your wood. Different woods have different sounds, and you have to know how thin you can make the wood without having it collapse on you. You want a guitar to be light enough to be responsive but not so thin that they collapse.

East Indian rosewood OM (Orchestra Model) guitar by John Mannino

East Indian rosewood OM (Orchestra Model) guitar by John Mannino

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I build every part of my guitars entirely by hand. Each guitar takes me a couple months to build. I made four this winter. I build the guitar itself then lacquer it, then let it set for two weeks to a month, then sand it down and buff it. Then I string it and let it set some more. Then I do the final setup, put strings on it, and play it. Of course while I’m waiting on one I can work on other ones.

When you’re into guitar making, there’s no such thing as too much wood. I buy wood all over. On the internet, at shows, at symposiums put on by ‘ASIA’ — the Association of Stringed Instrument Artisans. I work a lot with East Indian Rosewood, Honduran Mahogany, padauk, lacewood, ebony, and many more woods.

“This would be impossible without my Woodmaster Drum Sander.”

My Woodmaster Drum Sander is my most important piece of equipment. I couldn’t build guitars without it. It would be impossible to do what I do without my Woodmaster Drum Sander. When I started out, I got a Delta sander. It was $1,100 or so and was a big piece of junk. It kept breaking down, it was in the repair shop more than in my wood shop. My son did some research and learned about Woodmaster. The Woodmaster Drum Sander is built like a tank and is not that much more than Delta® and Grizzly® equipment that’s made in China.

I’m very satisfied and happy with my Woodmaster. It’s well used; I’ve had it four or five years and it’s never broken down. It’s very precise; I can sand wood down as thin as 80 thousandths of an inch. I make the backs of my guitars 100 thousandths. The sides are 80 to 90 thousandths.

For anybody doing delicate woodworking…

Toby, John's Old English Sheepdog, keeps watch as he prepares to play.

Toby, John’s Old English Sheepdog, keeps watch as John prepares to play.

My goal in all this is to make as many guitars of the highest quality I can before they put me in the ground. Building a quality guitar is a real challenge! For anybody else who wants to make guitars, or anybody doing delicate work like this, I’d highly recommend getting a Woodmaster Drum Sander.”

— John Mannino, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, Lumber City Guitars, Reedsville PA

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MAKING ADIRONDACK STYLE FURNITURE with a Woodmaster Drum Sander

Vega 2 A09

imageGMD

Adirondack Vintage InteriorEstablished in 1892, the Adirondack Park in northeastern New York State is over 6 million acres of pristine, mountainous wilderness with dozens of mountains, over 3,000 crystal clear lakes, and more than 30,000 miles of sparkling waterways. It’s twice as big as Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon National Parks…combined!

It’s also the birthplace of rustic, decorative Adirondack Style furniture made of native woods, saplings, birch bark, and more. Distinctive and ruggedly handsome, Adirondack Style was created by early 1800’s settlers who built and furnished their cabins with what was available. Today, the style is perfected and popularized by skilled craftsmen like Richard Vega, woodworker, artisan, and Woodmaster Drum Sander owner.

Vega 1 csi 4“I build high quality, rustic, Adirondack Style furniture — tables, cabinets, chairs, and more. I use different grades of woods; red oak, white oak, curly maple, pine, cherry, and exotic woods, too. We’re a small, mom-and-pop, internet-based business but my customers are hotels, restaurants, and celebrities including a major movie director. I’ve built a lot of furniture for a big hotel at a Six Flags amusement park. We do business with decorators in New York City, California, the Midwest. We have a big project coming up in Lake Tahoe.

My tables are often very big, from 36” to 48” wide — sometimes up to 60” wide — and 7’ to 24’ long! When you’re doing large projects or large orders, you want to save time and the Woodmaster does the trick for us. It saves is a lot of time.

Creating flat faces on round saplings

I use a lot of hickory saplings in my furniture. I get them from specialized tree farms. Some of our tables have trim made of hickory saplings that are split lengthwise. I found a way I could smooth the split faces on the Woodmaster. showtab3I put them, split side up, between two rails and run them through the sander. That evens out the faces so they fit nice and tight to the table edges.

I’ve owned and used Woodmaster Drum Sanders for many years. I have two of them — a 38” 3875 and a 50” 5075. I keep them well maintained and they do exactly what they’re supposed to do, create perfect surfaces. They’re very powerful and I’ve had no trouble. I’ve had other drum sanders and changing sandpaper on them was very time consuming. They had steel drums with clips to hold the paper. It’s hard to get your fingers in there with the clips and paper changes take too much time. Woodmaster’s Velcro® system makes paper changes easy. It takes less than 5 minutes.

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Vega Letter to Woodmaster

imageJ93

1/4 turn equals 1/16 of an inch sanding depth

We use my Woodmasters to do some restoration work, too. People bring in beautiful red oak doors from 1800’s homes and ‘Great Camps’ in the area and we put them through one of the Woodmasters. It’s very precise so I can sand off the gloss finish and the stain, right down to the oak, then refinish them. I take off only a little at a time using 180 or even 220 grit. The Woodmaster’s very precise — 1/4 turn of the handle equals 1/64th of an inch sanding depth.

ricktabI chose Woodmaster for several reasons. First, it’s made in the USA. Also, it came with a very good warranty, especially on the motor. It’s a very powerful motor compared to other sanders. And of course the price — you can’t beat the price and the quality. The customer service is right on the money, too. They have technicians there who will handle all your questions.

60” wide tabletops

I got the ‘big daddy’ 50” model because many of my tabletops are as wide as 48”. And I added the 38” model to handle 36” tabletops and end tables. I’ve built tops as wide as 60”. In those cases, I make two, 30” wide halves and glue them together.

imageSUKWoodmaster’s affordable, high quality

I’m absolutely happy with my Woodmasters. You really get quality, at a good price, and you couldn’t get a better machine. You can’t beat the Woodmaster Drum Sander for low price and high accuracy.

My only advice for anybody thinking about getting a Woodmaster Drum Sander is this: if you’re going to buy a drum sander, go with Woodmaster. You won’t regret it.”

— Richard Vega, Adirondack Rustic Designs, Woodmaster Drum Sander owner

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“CAN I FACE-SAND ALUMINUM CASTINGS on the Woodmaster Drum Sander?” — Woodmaster’s not just for woodworkers!

Drum sanding's not just for woodworkers! Art Blackwelder has a nice business creating cast aluminum markers for golf courses. He paints the castings then removes the paint from the high spots to highlight the lettering and design. What's the best way he's found to do this? His Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Drum sanding’s not just for woodworkers! Art Blackwelder has a nice business creating cast aluminum markers for golf courses. He paints the castings then removes the paint from the high spots to highlight the lettering and design. What’s the best way he’s found to do this? His Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Drum sanders are for woodworkers, right? Well, not always. Art Blackwelder is a Woodmaster Drum Sander owner who uses his Woodmaster to face aluminum castings.

Besides wood, what do YOU sand that a drum sander would sand better? (Take our SPECIAL SANDING CHALLENGE, below)

OK, now think about it: what are YOU building, making, or manufacturing that could be done faster, easier, and better with a high-precision, tough as nails, Made in America Woodmaster Drum Sander?

PAINTED PLAQUES GO IN — Art mounts his painted castings on a jig and runs them through his Woodmaster Drum Sander.

PAINTED PLAQUES GO IN — Art mounts his painted castings on a jig and runs them through his Woodmaster Drum Sander.

 FINISHED PLAQUES COME OUT — One pass through the Woodmaster Drum Sander shaves the paint off the surface of the plaques' lettering and design details. The result? A perfect, professional finish in a fraction of the time it used to take.

FINISHED PLAQUES COME OUT — One pass through the Woodmaster Drum Sander shaves the paint off the surface of the plaques’ lettering and design details. The result? A perfect, professional finish in a fraction of the time it used to take.

“I owned a pattern shop for 24 years, now I own Eagle Golf Products. We were the first company to make custom cast golf course equipment like tee markers and yardage markers. We make patterns using a golf club’s logo and lettering, then cast the markers out of aluminum.

3 sanding problems, 1 Woodmaster solution

  1. SWIRL MARKS — PROBLEM SOLVED

We paint the finished castings then sand the paint off the faces of the lettering and logo so they stand out. I had a big, 30” disk sander but it would always leave swirl marks. We sell through dealers and they didn’t like that. The Woodmaster Drum Sander sands straight across without swirl marks.

  1. SANDING HEAT — PROBLEM SOLVED

Our disk sander would heat up the casting. The paint would get gummy, then dust particles would mix in with the paint and we’d have to redo everything. Now we sand the faces with the Woodmaster Drum Sander. It doesn’t heat up the castings so the paint doesn’t get gummy.

  1. SANDING DEPTH — PROBLEM SOLVED

Some club logos are intricate. When we used a disk sander, if you held a disk sander on it too long, it would remove all the detail in an instant. With the Woodmaster, we have control over sanding depth, over what we take off. We take off just 1/32” — it does what we need it to.

The Woodmaster's self-feeding feature makes production simple. The rated of feed can be adjusted to the workpiece. And the sanding depth can be fine tuned to the thousandth of an inch.

The Woodmaster’s self-feeding feature makes production simple. The rated of feed can be adjusted to the workpiece. And the sanding depth can be fine tuned to the thousandth of an inch.

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Time Saver, Money Maker

Some of the many plaques Art's turned out in his shop. Very nice!

Some of the many plaques Art’s turned out in his shop. Very nice!

Grinding our markers always took a lot of time. The Woodmaster Drum Sander’s saving us a lot of time. With my old disk sander, it would take a minute and a half to sand each marker. With my Woodmaster, we can sand six or eight markers in the same amount of time. We made a jig to hold our castings, a piece of plywood with six holes cut in it hold 6 castings so you can simply run them all through at once.

Actually, we can now finish 6 or 8 markers in less time than it took to sand one. It really works great. Our Woodmaster’s been making us money, that’s what counts!

Deal Sealer: Risk Free Trial, Financing, no payments for 3 months

Other companies have drum sanders but I like Woodmaster’s best. I like that I can reverse the variable-rate feed belt and bring the workpiece back to me. I just think the machine is super.

The Woodmaster paid for itself in under a year. I saw a Woodmaster ad and called for the information on it. What sealed the deal was I didn’t have to pay for it all at once. They gave me 3 months to try it before I had to pay.

Brass, bronze, aluminum — Art surfaces many metals with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. What are YOU sanding that a Woodmaster could handle faster, easier, better?

Brass, bronze, aluminum — Art surfaces many metals with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. What are YOU sanding that a Woodmaster could handle faster, easier, better?

“Hello, Woodmaster? Will this machine do what I want it to do?”

I called Woodmaster before I tried grinding aluminum on it and they assured me it would do what I wanted it to do, like face bronze or aluminum castings. They said just take a light cut on the face of the marker. Works great.

We always need it yesterday — Woodmaster ships fast

You’re always running out of something when you run a shop, and you always need it at the last minute. We call Woodmaster when we need something and I haven’t had a problem. We get our order quickly, they ship well.

— Art Blackwelder, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, North Carolina

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 Take our SPECIAL SANDING CHALLENGE:

If the Woodmaster Drum Sander will  handle Art Blackwelder’s cast aluminum markers, what else will it sand? Well, what have you got? Call 1-800-821-6651  or email and challenge us. Tell us what you’re sanding and we’ll tell you how our Drum Sander will create a perfect finish faster, easier, and better than your current sanding method!

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BUILD A POOL TABLE – Mesquite and a Woodmaster Drum Sander

 

1 Mesquite pool tableCharles (Chuck) Phelps tells us he’s a self-taught woodworker. Well, he obviously a good teacher and a good student. He recently completed his “dream project,” a regulation-size pool table. His strong math background played a big part, as did  his Woodmaster Drum Sander. Here’s Chuck’s story…

“I was an economics and math major in college and I use geometry to plan many of my projects, figuring out what angles to cut and how to achieve them repeatedly. I’m a self-taught woodworker, I never had woodworking training. I work by trial and error, trying things out on scrap wood. And I use a lot of scrap wood!

Chuck's pool table is a beauty. His Woodmater Drum Sander and Woodmaster Molder/Planer helped  him turn a long-time dream project into a reality.

Chuck’s pool table is a beauty. His Woodmater Drum Sander and Woodmaster Molder/Planer helped him turn a long-time dream project into a reality.

I recently built my biggest, most difficult woodworking project, a regulation-size, 4’ x 8’ pool table. I couldn’t have built this pool table without my 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Mesquite’s very stable — doesn’t shrink or expand with moisture

Chuck runs one of his solid wood backgammon boards through his 38% Woodmaster Drum Sander to get a perfectly smooth, even, perfect surface.

Chuck runs one of his solid wood backgammon boards through his 38″ Woodmaster Drum Sander to get a perfectly smooth, even, perfect surface.

I’d had a slate pool table bed for years just waiting for this project. I found plans on the internet and chose to build my pool table it from mesquite. It’s a pest tree in the south where huge areas are overgrown with it. They just bulldoze it out. But it’s a great wood to work with because it is very stable and doesn’t shrink or expand with moisture. I found a woodworker who salvages, saws, and sells it. Besides my Woodmaster Drum Sander, I have a Woodmaster Molder/Planer. I ran the wood through it to get it all to uniform thickness.

Right rail heightIt was really crucial to have the Woodmaster Drum Sander for this project because it gives you extremely precise, repeatable thicknessing. For example, the pool table’s rail height must be exactly 63% of the diameter of the ball so the rail’s ‘nose’ is just above the ball’s center. If the rail hits below center, the ball will fly off the table! The rail height works out to a very odd and precise measurement and you can’t create that height by stacking commercially made lumber.

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1/6 turn equals 1/100″ sanding depth adjustment

The Woodmaster Drum Sander is extremely precise. When I turn the height adjustment crank one full turn, it changes the sanding depth exactly 1/16”. To change the depth just 1/100” I turn the crank just 1/6 of a turn, the equivalent of 10 minutes on a clock face. This drum sander’s precision is really quite amazing.

For the side panels, I chose highly figured wood and it needed a lot of attention from my drum sander. The legs are all glue-ups. I have a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too, and I used it to get really smooth surfaces.

Anyone for backgammon? Commercial boards' diamond-shaped pieces are laminated to a substrate. Chuck makes his of solid wood. It takes real precision to do this kind of work!

Anyone for backgammon? Commercial boards’ diamond-shaped pieces are laminated to a substrate. Chuck makes his of solid wood. It takes real precision to do this kind of work!

I make backgammon boards, too. The design is very elaborate with lots of diamond shapes. Commercial backgammon boards are laminated but I make them from solid wood. I use three woods and put them through the drum sander. I cut all the diamond shapes and pieces, glue them up, and put them through the Drum Sander again to get a perfectly even surface. This would be impossible to do without the Woodmaster Drum Sander.

“Woodmaster’s obviously the best on the market”

I do lots of research before I buy tools and I try to buy the best. Woodmaster equipment is obviously the best on the market. You can’t get Woodmaster’s throat width on equipment from Home Depot. I looked at a drum sander that had a cantilever head — it was attached only on one side. I rejected it simply because of that design.

charles cardI’d advise others to not skimp on inferior equipment. If you get a machine that doesn’t work well, it’ll drive you crazy. It’s simply a mistake to start with imprecise tools. The Woodmaster Drum Sander has tremendous durability, strength, and it’s very safe to use. I have no ambiguity at all – it’s by far the best drum sander available.”

— Charles Phelps, Woodmaster Owner, Gualala CA

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“WOODMASTER JOBS KEEP COMING AND WE CAN’T SAY NO” — Woodworking couple’s happy & BUSY in retirement

John Lepien

Kaye Lepien

Here’s a happy couple who’ve found the secret of a full and rewarding retirement. John and Kaye Lepien are woodworking partners. “We work together and design things together,” says John.

“It gives us both a creative outlet so we don’t just sit around as so many retirees do.” And how’s business? “We’re almost busier than we’d like but it’s awfully hard to turn jobs down.”

“I taught Industrial Arts for 36 years. I retired in 1997 at 57. Today, my wife, Kaye, and I run our own woodworking business, J & K Creations, and have a Woodmaster Drum Sander. Business is great. In fact, we’re busier than we’d like to be. It’s awfully hard to turn jobs down.

It’s not about the money

John and Kaye's daughter sells the work her parents do with their Woodmaster. Her online catalog describes this piece, "Handcrafted in Michigan. Colonial Pipebox. Distressed Olde Forge Mustard paint by Olde Centry Colors with brown stain. Box measures 17.5"h x 6"w x 4.25"d. Sorry pick not included."

John and Kaye’s daughter sells the work her parents do with their Woodmaster. Her online catalog describes this piece, “Handcrafted in Michigan. Colonial Pipebox. Distressed Olde Forge Mustard paint by Olde Centry Colors with brown stain. Box measures 17.5″h x 6″w x 4.25″d. Sorry pick not included.”

Money is not the object of our business at all. It’s not about the money. Our business keeps us active and busy. So many people retire and have nothing to do. They just sit around and they die! I see it all the time.

This business is something Kaye and I can do together. We’re here in the shop together all day long and that’s great. We work together and we design things together. It gives us both a creative outlet.

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Every day’s different

I once worked in a factory at the same machine for 8 or 10 hours a day and I said ‘I’m just not going to do this for the rest of my life. It’s boring!’ Today, in our business, every day’s different and I love it.

Kaye and I started out selling what we made at craft shows. Then our daughter bought a store in downtown Iona, Michigan, ‘Keeper of the Crows,’  where she sells primitive home décor and antiques. We supply over 50 primitive-style wooden items to her store.

We make ‘primitives’ and antique-style items of pine and poplar. We round the edges and corners and mar the surfaces a little. Then Kaye paints them and we sand off the corners to give a ‘distressed’ look. Kaye adds stain and we finish it with Crystalac. It acts like a lacquer but it’s water-based and dries in no time.

Folding cutting boards and more, every kind you can imagine

Online, John & Kaye's "Colonial Candlebox" is described and sold as, "Distressed redish/orange with dark brown stain. Box measures 14"h x 8.5" w x 4.75" d. Sorry does not include flower pick."

Online, John & Kaye’s “Colonial Candlebox” is described and sold as, “Distressed redish/orange with dark brown stain. Box measures 14″h x 8.5″ w x 4.75″ d. Sorry does not include flower pick.”

We make custom furniture, too. I use walnut, cherry, maple, hickory and more. There’s no waste: I save all the cutoffs and leftover pieces of hardwood from other projects and make every kind of cutting board you can think of. They sell like crazy, especially at the Holidays. This is where our Woodmaster Drum Sander comes in so handy. We make 40 or 50 cutting boards at a time. We glue them up and send them through the Woodmaster and they come out perfect.

“We use our Woodmaster Drum Sander 4 to 5 hours every day.”

"Colonial Shelf" by John and Kaye. Their daughter sells their work online. She writes, "Love this little shelf/setter. Distressed sage green. Shelf measures 16 1/2"h x 12"w x 5 3/8"d. Sorry crock not included."

“Colonial Shelf” by John and Kaye. Their daughter sells their work online. She writes, “Love this little shelf/setter. Distressed sage green. Shelf measures 16 1/2″h x 12″w x 5 3/8″d. Sorry crock not included.”

Our 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander works like crazy. I use it every day, four or five hours a day. We use it to make all kinds of things — fancy little boxes; mahogany cribbage boards; furniture; shelving; kitchen islands; cabinets; US flag boxes; all kinds of things. We designed and make a folding cribbage board. I did a kitchen and bathroom out of white pine for a retired state trooper. I make a lot of things that have drawers so I make 50 drawers at a time with the drum sander. We’re very diversified and we’re always making new designs. I’d be lost without my Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Also, I do custom sanding. A lot of people come in asking me to sand things for them. A young man just brought in 10 walnut boards he wanted sanded. I just made a 6’ by 34” wooden floor panel for a fellow who’s turning a Cadillac hearse into a limousine. The word gets out and I get calls. I don’t advertise, the word just spreads. I got three calls yesterday!

I’d never used a wide drum sander until I made a big project for myself using a friend’s drum sander. I got a Grizzly® drum sander but I hated it and practically gave the damn thing away. After that bad experience, I shopped around and got my Woodmaster. I used it every day. All the time.

He sets sanding depth by ear

I got the 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander because I wanted to run doors. I just ran more than 30 doors for one job! Here’s how I set the sanding depth: I set it so the drum doesn’t quite touch the workpiece. I turn the Woodmaster’s handle until I can hear the drum just kiss the wood. Then I turn it just a touch more — that’s my setting.

In 36 years as an Industrial Arts teacher, I’ve seen all kinds of equipment and, yes, that experience influenced my decision to buy a Woodmaster. I’d buy another one in a minute. The people at Woodmaster are great, too. You can call and talk to them. I call them a lot when I have technical questions. I get on the phone with Woodmaster and I get people who know what the hell they’re talking about!”

— John Lepien, Woodmaster Owner, J & K Creations, Saranac MI

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HOW TO DO A DAY’S WORTH OF HAND-SANDING IN 15 MINUTES (Hint: Woodmaster Drum Sander)

Besides cabinetry, Jeff builds handsome Adirondack chairs with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. This style chair, with slanted seat and back, is both handsome and comfortable.

Besides cabinetry, Jeff builds handsome Adirondack chairs with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. This style chair, with slanted seat and back, is both handsome and comfortable.

OK, woodworkers, which would you rather do: spend an 8-hour day pushing a hand-sander around, or zip your work through a Woodmaster Drum Sander in 15 minutes? Or let’s put it another way: how’d you like to reduce the time you spend hand-sanding by 97%?

For cabinetmaker/furniture maker, Jeff Rhone, those time-saving numbers are real, and those questions are no-brainers. But the time Jeff saves is just one of four reasons he chose the Woodmaster Drum Sander. Please read on…

Jeff Rhone's running a great business from a small wood shop — just 600 sq. ft. He put his Woodmaster on casters so he can tuck it out of the way between sanding tasks.

Jeff Rhone’s running a great business from a small wood shop — just 600 sq. ft. He put his Woodmaster on casters so he can tuck it out of the way between sanding tasks.

“I run a one-man custom cabinetry shop. Most of the work I do is custom cabinets and furniture. I specialize in small cabinetry jobs, kitchens, pantries, mudrooms, closets, entertainment centers, and so on. I started woodworking in a small custom cabinet shop. We’d take on anything — furniture, refinishing, everything. Our main bread and butter work was custom cabinets. Eventually, I went out on my own.

Everything from face frames to furniture parts — saves literally days of hand sanding

I first ran into the Woodmaster Drum Sander in trade school. The school had a Woodmaster and I thought it worked great. I ended up getting a Woodmaster 38” Drum Sander and I’ve used it on every project I’ve built since I got it — everything from sanding down face frames to sanding all the pieces for the Adirondack chairs I build. This sander has saved me literally days of hand sanding. It is a Godsend.

"The cart in this photo is a gun cart," Jeff tells us. " The gentleman who asked me to built it uses it in old style Western shooting competitions. It has a gun rack and room in the box for ammo."

“The cart in this photo is a gun cart,” Jeff tells us. ” The gentleman who asked me to built it uses it in old style Western shooting competitions. It has a gun rack and room in the box for ammo.”

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My current shop is just 600 sq. ft.. I have a lot of big tools like shapers and so on but the Woodmaster fits right in. It has a small footprint and it’s on casters so I can move it where I want it. My Woodmaster works out perfectly.

I do everything myself, I don’t send anything out. I do one project at a time, anything from cutting boards to kitchens. I make a lot of Adirondack-style chairs and the sanding the Woodmaster does is remarkable. It does in 15 minutes what would take me a full day to do by hand.

Slashes sanding time 90%

Here's a handsome entertainment center ready for installation. Jeff does all manner of cabinetry — kitchens, bathrooms, closets, more.

Here’s one of Jeff’s handsome entertainment centers ready for installation. He builds all manner of cabinetry — kitchens, bathrooms, closets, more.

Woodmaster says a cabinetmaker spends 60% of his time hand-sanding, and that the Woodmaster saves 90% of that time. I agree with that 100%. For example, making chairs. When I was hand-sanding, it would take me a whole day to hand-sand all the parts for just two chairs. Today I just sent all the parts for four chairs through my Woodmaster in under half an hour. And the surface quality the Woodmaster creates is great. (Note: when we did the math, Jeff’s Woodmaster actually saves him 97% of the time he spent hand-sanding.)

Between sanding jobs, Jeff's Woodmaster rolls out of the way so he's able to maximize the utility of his 600 sq. ft. shop.

Between sanding jobs, Jeff’s Woodmaster rolls out of the way so he’s able to maximize the utility of his 600 sq. ft. shop.

I chose the 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander so I could run 36” cabinet doors and face frames without any issue. I can do entry doors up to 36”. This size works great for butcher block counter tops I make, too. They’re 25” wide — a 24” sander’s not quite wide enough for that.

The other Woodmaster advantage is the ease of sanding a lot of small parts. I just send them through side by side. They come out the other end and drop onto a table I have set up to catch them on the outfeed side.

Jeff chose Woodmaster for 4 reasons: Affordability, Made in America, Small Footprint, Saves Time

I chose Woodmaster for several reasons. First, it’s affordable. It’s cost effective — you’d pay twice as much for a Powermatic. Second, it’s made in America. That’s important, keeping jobs in the USA. USA tools are better made than imports. Third, it has a small footprint. I’ve got it on optional casters and I can move it out, use it, and move it back. Other sanders didn’t work like that.

chairs 3-4And fourth, it saves time and everybody knows time is money. For somebody like me, a small shop woodworker, it’s saved me literally days and days of hand sanding. It paid for itself a year ago. I’d give this machine a 10. It’s one of my most-used machine in my shop, right after my table saw and my chop saw.

Booked 3 months ahead — no regrets

I don’t advertise and don’t want to. Right now, I’m booked out three months or more. I’d recommend it to other woodworkers and I’d do it again myself. I researched drum sanders for almost 10 months. I don’t regret my decision at all.

I can’t ask for a better drum sander. It’s a quality machine. The way it’s made, I could use it all day long and never have an issue. I love it, wouldn’t get rid of it. Woodmaster, keep up the good work!”

— Jeff Rhone, cabinetmaker, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, South Dakota

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HOW TO MAKE LAMINATED “WIGGLE CANES” with a Woodmaster Drum Sander

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Here's retired engineer and dedicated woodworker, Dennis Westphal, with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. Thanks, Dennis, for sharing your secrets for creating your exceptional "Wiggle Canes!"

Here’s retired engineer and dedicated woodworker, Dennis Westphal, with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. Thanks, Dennis, for sharing your secrets for creating your exceptional “Wiggle Canes!”

Dennis Westphal is a woodworker who loves a challenge. Maybe his decades in engineering inspire him to take on highly complex projects. He certainly has a knack for merging two exacting disciplines — woodworking and engineering — in the production of his extraordinary “Wiggle Canes.”

Dennis has been kind enough to share specific “how-to” detail on his entire production procedure and we’re happy to pass it all along to you. Note he stresses the importance of the precision it takes to produce his 15-layer, laminated Wiggle Canes — the kind of precision he achieves with his Woodmaster Drum Sander.

 “I like to make unique woodworking projects, things that are a little different, things not a lot of people make. That’s why I make what I call ‘Wiggle Canes,’ functional walking canes with a definite wiggle in them. I like making them and I just like the way they look.

I’ve made Wiggle Canes as gift for people who need walking assistance, people we know who’ve moved into assisted living homes. People wouldn’t want to pay me for the time it takes — maybe 25 hours apiece between sawing, sanding, soaking, gluing, and finishing.

I like this 2675 Woodmster Drum Sander. I use it almost every day. I don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t have it. I guess I’d have to get another one! Thanks for the opportunity to show some of my projects to other woodworkers.

Precision Sanding is ESSENTIAL

002I got the Woodmaster Drum Sander because I wanted a machine that would give me precision and speed for the kind of work I do. I knew the precision this Drum Sander would give me. I did a lot of online research and read comments from Woodmaster owners. I asked questions and got pretty positive results. I chose the 26” 2675 because it’s big enough to handle any project I’d want to make.

Each cane is made of 15 layers of wood, each layer 1/16 of an inch thick. I glue up strips in five sections, with three layers in each section, and then glue the sections together.

I make them with different patterns. Some have layers of walnut on the outer layers and maple in the middle. Some have maple outer layers and walnut middle layers. I’ve made them of all walnut, and all oak. I build them extra long so they can be cut to the right length for the person who’s using them.

Dennis reveals how he does it…so you can make Wiggle Canes, too!

Ripping Strips

007Here’s how I cut the strips on my table saw. The curved fixture behind the blade allows the strip to curve away from the stock piece to avoid binding.

Precision Thickness Control

010To control the thickness of the strips being cut, I use this dial indicator set-up. It is mounted on a magnetic base that sits on the top face of the saw on the right side of the fence. The plunger on this indicator moves in or out 0.100” per one full turn of the indicator pointer. This works well for what I need for the strips.

I make an initial skim cut on the stock to make sure the two edges of the stock are parallel, and to set up the cutting of the strip. After the skim cut is complete, without moving the fence, I place the indicator fixture in place by putting the indicator plunger against the right side of the fence and pushing it toward the fence for most of the available travel of the plunger. I stop the fixture with the indicator pointer at zero on the gauge. This zeros the gauge.

Next I move the fence toward the blade two full turns of the indicator pointer, stopping again at zero. Since this indicator moves 0.100” per turn, I have moved the fence 0.200”. This also moves the stock the same 0.200” from its zeroed position after the skim cut. Since I am using a 1/8” (0.125”) kerf ripping blade, the stock is now 0.075” (0.200” – 0.125”) to the left of the blade resulting in a nominal thickness of 0.075” for strip as it is cut.

Due to the blade not cutting exactly 0.125” and possibly some slight side-to-side movement of the stock as it is being pushed through, the actual stock thickness comes out in the 0.065” to 0.070” range.

This makes it ideal for one or two passes through the Woodmaster, with a very small amount being removed per pass. I end up with the desired 0.062” (1/16”) thickness. I always use scrap stock to cut some strips, both to confirm the thickness of the strip coming off the saw and to set the Woodmaster to the proper height and to know when that proper height is set, and if one or two passes are required.

Sand to precise thickness with the Woodmaster Drum Sander

004Here’s an MDF board with double stick tape that’ll hold the strips as I run them through my Woodmaster Drum Sander.

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Gang-Sand Several Wood Strips for Uniform Thickness

002I’ve attached six strips to the MDF board with double stick tape. This photo shows them feeding through my Woodmaster.

Soak Strips in Water for 24 Hours

005I soak strips in water for 24 hours after I sand them to the required thickness (1/16” or .062) in this water-filled PVC pipe fixture. I place small pieces of scraps between the strips to allow better contact between the water and strips. Then I hold the bundle together with rubber bands

Clamp Strips in a Drying Rack to Shape Them & Form the “Wiggle”

Drying Rack - 2After the strips are soaked in water for 24 hours, all fifteen strips are placed in the clamping/gluing fixture, clamped to form the Wiggle and the curved handle. They’re allowed to dry for a minimum of 24 hours. They are then removed and placed (in proper order) into this drying rack to fully dry. The way it is made, it holds the curves as the strips dry because, if the strips were to just dry loose, they would lose most of the curves — they’d tend to go back to their initial flat shape. As noted above, since only five strips are glued at one time, this holds the remaining pieces in the proper shape until they can be glued.

Apply Glue to Strips Mounted on a Gluing Fixture

Glue Fixture 1This fixture holds each strip as I add the glue using a roller. Due to the shape of the strips, it is very difficult to roll on the glue with one hand while trying to hold it with the other hand, so I came up with this.

Glue Strips & Clamp Tightly

Fixture 1 - smallThis photo shows an overhead view of my clamping/gluing fixture in place with the first five strips in place. Due to the complexity of putting the glue on the strips, putting them together, putting them into the fixture, properly aligning everything, and adding the clamps, you only have time for five strips before the glue starts to set up. To hold everything in place, a spacer equal to the thickness of the other 10 strips is added. After 24 hours, the spacer and the five glued up strips are removed from the fixture. The spacer is replaced by a thinner one that is equal to the thickness of five strips. Next, the second five strips are glued to the first five and placed back into the fixture with the thinner spacer, clamped and allowed to sit again for 24 hours. This is repeated a third time with the final five strips and no spacer, again for 24 hours. Then sand and apply a finish.

Notes from Dennis…

I’m a retired engineer and I enjoy making Wiggle Canes because they’re a blend of engineering and woodworking. I’ve got a CAD application on my computer and I lay out everything with it. I figure out all the ‘what ifs’ and see what each can would look like. I make half a dozen drawings then draw the individual pieces and parts.

Giving credit where it’s due, the concept of the Wiggle Cane is not mine. I picked up the idea from a woodworking site from a woodworker who goes by the name “Nimrod.” The fixtures and procedures noted above are all mine but Nimrod gave me the idea to develop them and make the canes. Nimrod’s canes were the curved handle version, but the “Gentleman’s” cane with the different handle that is added to the Wiggle portion is my idea and development.”

— Dennis Westphal, Woodmaster Drum Sander owner, Galva, Kansas

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