BUILD A POOL TABLE – Mesquite and a Woodmaster Drum Sander

 

1 Mesquite pool tableCharles (Chuck) Phelps tells us he’s a self-taught woodworker. Well, he obviously a good teacher and a good student. He recently completed his “dream project,” a regulation-size pool table. His strong math background played a big part, as did  his Woodmaster Drum Sander. Here’s Chuck’s story…

“I was an economics and math major in college and I use geometry to plan many of my projects, figuring out what angles to cut and how to achieve them repeatedly. I’m a self-taught woodworker, I never had woodworking training. I work by trial and error, trying things out on scrap wood. And I use a lot of scrap wood!

Chuck's pool table is a beauty. His Woodmater Drum Sander and Woodmaster Molder/Planer helped  him turn a long-time dream project into a reality.

Chuck’s pool table is a beauty. His Woodmater Drum Sander and Woodmaster Molder/Planer helped him turn a long-time dream project into a reality.

I recently built my biggest, most difficult woodworking project, a regulation-size, 4’ x 8’ pool table. I couldn’t have built this pool table without my 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Mesquite’s very stable — doesn’t shrink or expand with moisture

Chuck runs one of his solid wood backgammon boards through his 38% Woodmaster Drum Sander to get a perfectly smooth, even, perfect surface.

Chuck runs one of his solid wood backgammon boards through his 38″ Woodmaster Drum Sander to get a perfectly smooth, even, perfect surface.

I’d had a slate pool table bed for years just waiting for this project. I found plans on the internet and chose to build my pool table it from mesquite. It’s a pest tree in the south where huge areas are overgrown with it. They just bulldoze it out. But it’s a great wood to work with because it is very stable and doesn’t shrink or expand with moisture. I found a woodworker who salvages, saws, and sells it. Besides my Woodmaster Drum Sander, I have a Woodmaster Molder/Planer. I ran the wood through it to get it all to uniform thickness.

Right rail heightIt was really crucial to have the Woodmaster Drum Sander for this project because it gives you extremely precise, repeatable thicknessing. For example, the pool table’s rail height must be exactly 63% of the diameter of the ball so the rail’s ‘nose’ is just above the ball’s center. If the rail hits below center, the ball will fly off the table! The rail height works out to a very odd and precise measurement and you can’t create that height by stacking commercially made lumber.

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

1/6 turn equals 1/100″ sanding depth adjustment

The Woodmaster Drum Sander is extremely precise. When I turn the height adjustment crank one full turn, it changes the sanding depth exactly 1/16”. To change the depth just 1/100” I turn the crank just 1/6 of a turn, the equivalent of 10 minutes on a clock face. This drum sander’s precision is really quite amazing.

For the side panels, I chose highly figured wood and it needed a lot of attention from my drum sander. The legs are all glue-ups. I have a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too, and I used it to get really smooth surfaces.

Anyone for backgammon? Commercial boards' diamond-shaped pieces are laminated to a substrate. Chuck makes his of solid wood. It takes real precision to do this kind of work!

Anyone for backgammon? Commercial boards’ diamond-shaped pieces are laminated to a substrate. Chuck makes his of solid wood. It takes real precision to do this kind of work!

I make backgammon boards, too. The design is very elaborate with lots of diamond shapes. Commercial backgammon boards are laminated but I make them from solid wood. I use three woods and put them through the drum sander. I cut all the diamond shapes and pieces, glue them up, and put them through the Drum Sander again to get a perfectly even surface. This would be impossible to do without the Woodmaster Drum Sander.

“Woodmaster’s obviously the best on the market”

I do lots of research before I buy tools and I try to buy the best. Woodmaster equipment is obviously the best on the market. You can’t get Woodmaster’s throat width on equipment from Home Depot. I looked at a drum sander that had a cantilever head — it was attached only on one side. I rejected it simply because of that design.

charles cardI’d advise others to not skimp on inferior equipment. If you get a machine that doesn’t work well, it’ll drive you crazy. It’s simply a mistake to start with imprecise tools. The Woodmaster Drum Sander has tremendous durability, strength, and it’s very safe to use. I have no ambiguity at all – it’s by far the best drum sander available.”

— Charles Phelps, Woodmaster Owner, Gualala CA

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

“WOODMASTER JOBS KEEP COMING AND WE CAN’T SAY NO” — Woodworking couple’s happy & BUSY in retirement

John Lepien

Kaye Lepien

Here’s a happy couple who’ve found the secret of a full and rewarding retirement. John and Kaye Lepien are woodworking partners. “We work together and design things together,” says John.

“It gives us both a creative outlet so we don’t just sit around as so many retirees do.” And how’s business? “We’re almost busier than we’d like but it’s awfully hard to turn jobs down.”

“I taught Industrial Arts for 36 years. I retired in 1997 at 57. Today, my wife, Kaye, and I run our own woodworking business, J & K Creations, and have a Woodmaster Drum Sander. Business is great. In fact, we’re busier than we’d like to be. It’s awfully hard to turn jobs down.

It’s not about the money

John and Kaye's daughter sells the work her parents do with their Woodmaster. Her online catalog describes this piece, "Handcrafted in Michigan. Colonial Pipebox. Distressed Olde Forge Mustard paint by Olde Centry Colors with brown stain. Box measures 17.5"h x 6"w x 4.25"d. Sorry pick not included."

John and Kaye’s daughter sells the work her parents do with their Woodmaster. Her online catalog describes this piece, “Handcrafted in Michigan. Colonial Pipebox. Distressed Olde Forge Mustard paint by Olde Centry Colors with brown stain. Box measures 17.5″h x 6″w x 4.25″d. Sorry pick not included.”

Money is not the object of our business at all. It’s not about the money. Our business keeps us active and busy. So many people retire and have nothing to do. They just sit around and they die! I see it all the time.

This business is something Kaye and I can do together. We’re here in the shop together all day long and that’s great. We work together and we design things together. It gives us both a creative outlet.

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

Every day’s different

I once worked in a factory at the same machine for 8 or 10 hours a day and I said ‘I’m just not going to do this for the rest of my life. It’s boring!’ Today, in our business, every day’s different and I love it.

Kaye and I started out selling what we made at craft shows. Then our daughter bought a store in downtown Iona, Michigan, ‘Keeper of the Crows,’  where she sells primitive home décor and antiques. We supply over 50 primitive-style wooden items to her store.

We make ‘primitives’ and antique-style items of pine and poplar. We round the edges and corners and mar the surfaces a little. Then Kaye paints them and we sand off the corners to give a ‘distressed’ look. Kaye adds stain and we finish it with Crystalac. It acts like a lacquer but it’s water-based and dries in no time.

Folding cutting boards and more, every kind you can imagine

Online, John & Kaye's "Colonial Candlebox" is described and sold as, "Distressed redish/orange with dark brown stain. Box measures 14"h x 8.5" w x 4.75" d. Sorry does not include flower pick."

Online, John & Kaye’s “Colonial Candlebox” is described and sold as, “Distressed redish/orange with dark brown stain. Box measures 14″h x 8.5″ w x 4.75″ d. Sorry does not include flower pick.”

We make custom furniture, too. I use walnut, cherry, maple, hickory and more. There’s no waste: I save all the cutoffs and leftover pieces of hardwood from other projects and make every kind of cutting board you can think of. They sell like crazy, especially at the Holidays. This is where our Woodmaster Drum Sander comes in so handy. We make 40 or 50 cutting boards at a time. We glue them up and send them through the Woodmaster and they come out perfect.

“We use our Woodmaster Drum Sander 4 to 5 hours every day.”

"Colonial Shelf" by John and Kaye. Their daughter sells their work online. She writes, "Love this little shelf/setter. Distressed sage green. Shelf measures 16 1/2"h x 12"w x 5 3/8"d. Sorry crock not included."

“Colonial Shelf” by John and Kaye. Their daughter sells their work online. She writes, “Love this little shelf/setter. Distressed sage green. Shelf measures 16 1/2″h x 12″w x 5 3/8″d. Sorry crock not included.”

Our 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander works like crazy. I use it every day, four or five hours a day. We use it to make all kinds of things — fancy little boxes; mahogany cribbage boards; furniture; shelving; kitchen islands; cabinets; US flag boxes; all kinds of things. We designed and make a folding cribbage board. I did a kitchen and bathroom out of white pine for a retired state trooper. I make a lot of things that have drawers so I make 50 drawers at a time with the drum sander. We’re very diversified and we’re always making new designs. I’d be lost without my Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Also, I do custom sanding. A lot of people come in asking me to sand things for them. A young man just brought in 10 walnut boards he wanted sanded. I just made a 6’ by 34” wooden floor panel for a fellow who’s turning a Cadillac hearse into a limousine. The word gets out and I get calls. I don’t advertise, the word just spreads. I got three calls yesterday!

I’d never used a wide drum sander until I made a big project for myself using a friend’s drum sander. I got a Grizzly® drum sander but I hated it and practically gave the damn thing away. After that bad experience, I shopped around and got my Woodmaster. I used it every day. All the time.

He sets sanding depth by ear

I got the 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander because I wanted to run doors. I just ran more than 30 doors for one job! Here’s how I set the sanding depth: I set it so the drum doesn’t quite touch the workpiece. I turn the Woodmaster’s handle until I can hear the drum just kiss the wood. Then I turn it just a touch more — that’s my setting.

In 36 years as an Industrial Arts teacher, I’ve seen all kinds of equipment and, yes, that experience influenced my decision to buy a Woodmaster. I’d buy another one in a minute. The people at Woodmaster are great, too. You can call and talk to them. I call them a lot when I have technical questions. I get on the phone with Woodmaster and I get people who know what the hell they’re talking about!”

— John Lepien, Woodmaster Owner, J & K Creations, Saranac MI

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

HOW TO DO A DAY’S WORTH OF HAND-SANDING IN 15 MINUTES (Hint: Woodmaster Drum Sander)

Besides cabinetry, Jeff builds handsome Adirondack chairs with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. This style chair, with slanted seat and back, is both handsome and comfortable.

Besides cabinetry, Jeff builds handsome Adirondack chairs with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. This style chair, with slanted seat and back, is both handsome and comfortable.

OK, woodworkers, which would you rather do: spend an 8-hour day pushing a hand-sander around, or zip your work through a Woodmaster Drum Sander in 15 minutes? Or let’s put it another way: how’d you like to reduce the time you spend hand-sanding by 97%?

For cabinetmaker/furniture maker, Jeff Rhone, those time-saving numbers are real, and those questions are no-brainers. But the time Jeff saves is just one of four reasons he chose the Woodmaster Drum Sander. Please read on…

Jeff Rhone's running a great business from a small wood shop — just 600 sq. ft. He put his Woodmaster on casters so he can tuck it out of the way between sanding tasks.

Jeff Rhone’s running a great business from a small wood shop — just 600 sq. ft. He put his Woodmaster on casters so he can tuck it out of the way between sanding tasks.

“I run a one-man custom cabinetry shop. Most of the work I do is custom cabinets and furniture. I specialize in small cabinetry jobs, kitchens, pantries, mudrooms, closets, entertainment centers, and so on. I started woodworking in a small custom cabinet shop. We’d take on anything — furniture, refinishing, everything. Our main bread and butter work was custom cabinets. Eventually, I went out on my own.

Everything from face frames to furniture parts — saves literally days of hand sanding

I first ran into the Woodmaster Drum Sander in trade school. The school had a Woodmaster and I thought it worked great. I ended up getting a Woodmaster 38” Drum Sander and I’ve used it on every project I’ve built since I got it — everything from sanding down face frames to sanding all the pieces for the Adirondack chairs I build. This sander has saved me literally days of hand sanding. It is a Godsend.

"The cart in this photo is a gun cart," Jeff tells us. " The gentleman who asked me to built it uses it in old style Western shooting competitions. It has a gun rack and room in the box for ammo."

“The cart in this photo is a gun cart,” Jeff tells us. ” The gentleman who asked me to built it uses it in old style Western shooting competitions. It has a gun rack and room in the box for ammo.”

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanderssale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planerssale prices, online specials

My current shop is just 600 sq. ft.. I have a lot of big tools like shapers and so on but the Woodmaster fits right in. It has a small footprint and it’s on casters so I can move it where I want it. My Woodmaster works out perfectly.

I do everything myself, I don’t send anything out. I do one project at a time, anything from cutting boards to kitchens. I make a lot of Adirondack-style chairs and the sanding the Woodmaster does is remarkable. It does in 15 minutes what would take me a full day to do by hand.

Slashes sanding time 90%

Here's a handsome entertainment center ready for installation. Jeff does all manner of cabinetry — kitchens, bathrooms, closets, more.

Here’s one of Jeff’s handsome entertainment centers ready for installation. He builds all manner of cabinetry — kitchens, bathrooms, closets, more.

Woodmaster says a cabinetmaker spends 60% of his time hand-sanding, and that the Woodmaster saves 90% of that time. I agree with that 100%. For example, making chairs. When I was hand-sanding, it would take me a whole day to hand-sand all the parts for just two chairs. Today I just sent all the parts for four chairs through my Woodmaster in under half an hour. And the surface quality the Woodmaster creates is great. (Note: when we did the math, Jeff’s Woodmaster actually saves him 97% of the time he spent hand-sanding.)

Between sanding jobs, Jeff's Woodmaster rolls out of the way so he's able to maximize the utility of his 600 sq. ft. shop.

Between sanding jobs, Jeff’s Woodmaster rolls out of the way so he’s able to maximize the utility of his 600 sq. ft. shop.

I chose the 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander so I could run 36” cabinet doors and face frames without any issue. I can do entry doors up to 36”. This size works great for butcher block counter tops I make, too. They’re 25” wide — a 24” sander’s not quite wide enough for that.

The other Woodmaster advantage is the ease of sanding a lot of small parts. I just send them through side by side. They come out the other end and drop onto a table I have set up to catch them on the outfeed side.

Jeff chose Woodmaster for 4 reasons: Affordability, Made in America, Small Footprint, Saves Time

I chose Woodmaster for several reasons. First, it’s affordable. It’s cost effective — you’d pay twice as much for a Powermatic. Second, it’s made in America. That’s important, keeping jobs in the USA. USA tools are better made than imports. Third, it has a small footprint. I’ve got it on optional casters and I can move it out, use it, and move it back. Other sanders didn’t work like that.

chairs 3-4And fourth, it saves time and everybody knows time is money. For somebody like me, a small shop woodworker, it’s saved me literally days and days of hand sanding. It paid for itself a year ago. I’d give this machine a 10. It’s one of my most-used machine in my shop, right after my table saw and my chop saw.

Booked 3 months ahead — no regrets

I don’t advertise and don’t want to. Right now, I’m booked out three months or more. I’d recommend it to other woodworkers and I’d do it again myself. I researched drum sanders for almost 10 months. I don’t regret my decision at all.

I can’t ask for a better drum sander. It’s a quality machine. The way it’s made, I could use it all day long and never have an issue. I love it, wouldn’t get rid of it. Woodmaster, keep up the good work!”

— Jeff Rhone, cabinetmaker, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, South Dakota

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanderssale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planerssale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

HOW TO MAKE LAMINATED “WIGGLE CANES” with a Woodmaster Drum Sander

121-2123_IMG

121-2156_IMG

XY 121-2123_IMG

Here's retired engineer and dedicated woodworker, Dennis Westphal, with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. Thanks, Dennis, for sharing your secrets for creating your exceptional "Wiggle Canes!"

Here’s retired engineer and dedicated woodworker, Dennis Westphal, with his Woodmaster Drum Sander. Thanks, Dennis, for sharing your secrets for creating your exceptional “Wiggle Canes!”

Dennis Westphal is a woodworker who loves a challenge. Maybe his decades in engineering inspire him to take on highly complex projects. He certainly has a knack for merging two exacting disciplines — woodworking and engineering — in the production of his extraordinary “Wiggle Canes.”

Dennis has been kind enough to share specific “how-to” detail on his entire production procedure and we’re happy to pass it all along to you. Note he stresses the importance of the precision it takes to produce his 15-layer, laminated Wiggle Canes — the kind of precision he achieves with his Woodmaster Drum Sander.

 “I like to make unique woodworking projects, things that are a little different, things not a lot of people make. That’s why I make what I call ‘Wiggle Canes,’ functional walking canes with a definite wiggle in them. I like making them and I just like the way they look.

I’ve made Wiggle Canes as gift for people who need walking assistance, people we know who’ve moved into assisted living homes. People wouldn’t want to pay me for the time it takes — maybe 25 hours apiece between sawing, sanding, soaking, gluing, and finishing.

I like this 2675 Woodmster Drum Sander. I use it almost every day. I don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t have it. I guess I’d have to get another one! Thanks for the opportunity to show some of my projects to other woodworkers.

Precision Sanding is ESSENTIAL

002I got the Woodmaster Drum Sander because I wanted a machine that would give me precision and speed for the kind of work I do. I knew the precision this Drum Sander would give me. I did a lot of online research and read comments from Woodmaster owners. I asked questions and got pretty positive results. I chose the 26” 2675 because it’s big enough to handle any project I’d want to make.

Each cane is made of 15 layers of wood, each layer 1/16 of an inch thick. I glue up strips in five sections, with three layers in each section, and then glue the sections together.

I make them with different patterns. Some have layers of walnut on the outer layers and maple in the middle. Some have maple outer layers and walnut middle layers. I’ve made them of all walnut, and all oak. I build them extra long so they can be cut to the right length for the person who’s using them.

Dennis reveals how he does it…so you can make Wiggle Canes, too!

Ripping Strips

007Here’s how I cut the strips on my table saw. The curved fixture behind the blade allows the strip to curve away from the stock piece to avoid binding.

Precision Thickness Control

010To control the thickness of the strips being cut, I use this dial indicator set-up. It is mounted on a magnetic base that sits on the top face of the saw on the right side of the fence. The plunger on this indicator moves in or out 0.100” per one full turn of the indicator pointer. This works well for what I need for the strips.

I make an initial skim cut on the stock to make sure the two edges of the stock are parallel, and to set up the cutting of the strip. After the skim cut is complete, without moving the fence, I place the indicator fixture in place by putting the indicator plunger against the right side of the fence and pushing it toward the fence for most of the available travel of the plunger. I stop the fixture with the indicator pointer at zero on the gauge. This zeros the gauge.

Next I move the fence toward the blade two full turns of the indicator pointer, stopping again at zero. Since this indicator moves 0.100” per turn, I have moved the fence 0.200”. This also moves the stock the same 0.200” from its zeroed position after the skim cut. Since I am using a 1/8” (0.125”) kerf ripping blade, the stock is now 0.075” (0.200” – 0.125”) to the left of the blade resulting in a nominal thickness of 0.075” for strip as it is cut.

Due to the blade not cutting exactly 0.125” and possibly some slight side-to-side movement of the stock as it is being pushed through, the actual stock thickness comes out in the 0.065” to 0.070” range.

This makes it ideal for one or two passes through the Woodmaster, with a very small amount being removed per pass. I end up with the desired 0.062” (1/16”) thickness. I always use scrap stock to cut some strips, both to confirm the thickness of the strip coming off the saw and to set the Woodmaster to the proper height and to know when that proper height is set, and if one or two passes are required.

Sand to precise thickness with the Woodmaster Drum Sander

004Here’s an MDF board with double stick tape that’ll hold the strips as I run them through my Woodmaster Drum Sander.

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

Gang-Sand Several Wood Strips for Uniform Thickness

002I’ve attached six strips to the MDF board with double stick tape. This photo shows them feeding through my Woodmaster.

Soak Strips in Water for 24 Hours

005I soak strips in water for 24 hours after I sand them to the required thickness (1/16” or .062) in this water-filled PVC pipe fixture. I place small pieces of scraps between the strips to allow better contact between the water and strips. Then I hold the bundle together with rubber bands

Clamp Strips in a Drying Rack to Shape Them & Form the “Wiggle”

Drying Rack - 2After the strips are soaked in water for 24 hours, all fifteen strips are placed in the clamping/gluing fixture, clamped to form the Wiggle and the curved handle. They’re allowed to dry for a minimum of 24 hours. They are then removed and placed (in proper order) into this drying rack to fully dry. The way it is made, it holds the curves as the strips dry because, if the strips were to just dry loose, they would lose most of the curves — they’d tend to go back to their initial flat shape. As noted above, since only five strips are glued at one time, this holds the remaining pieces in the proper shape until they can be glued.

Apply Glue to Strips Mounted on a Gluing Fixture

Glue Fixture 1This fixture holds each strip as I add the glue using a roller. Due to the shape of the strips, it is very difficult to roll on the glue with one hand while trying to hold it with the other hand, so I came up with this.

Glue Strips & Clamp Tightly

Fixture 1 - smallThis photo shows an overhead view of my clamping/gluing fixture in place with the first five strips in place. Due to the complexity of putting the glue on the strips, putting them together, putting them into the fixture, properly aligning everything, and adding the clamps, you only have time for five strips before the glue starts to set up. To hold everything in place, a spacer equal to the thickness of the other 10 strips is added. After 24 hours, the spacer and the five glued up strips are removed from the fixture. The spacer is replaced by a thinner one that is equal to the thickness of five strips. Next, the second five strips are glued to the first five and placed back into the fixture with the thinner spacer, clamped and allowed to sit again for 24 hours. This is repeated a third time with the final five strips and no spacer, again for 24 hours. Then sand and apply a finish.

Notes from Dennis…

I’m a retired engineer and I enjoy making Wiggle Canes because they’re a blend of engineering and woodworking. I’ve got a CAD application on my computer and I lay out everything with it. I figure out all the ‘what ifs’ and see what each can would look like. I make half a dozen drawings then draw the individual pieces and parts.

Giving credit where it’s due, the concept of the Wiggle Cane is not mine. I picked up the idea from a woodworking site from a woodworker who goes by the name “Nimrod.” The fixtures and procedures noted above are all mine but Nimrod gave me the idea to develop them and make the canes. Nimrod’s canes were the curved handle version, but the “Gentleman’s” cane with the different handle that is added to the Wiggle portion is my idea and development.”

— Dennis Westphal, Woodmaster Drum Sander owner, Galva, Kansas

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

“WE’RE JUST AVERAGE AMERICANS, starting a business with a Woodmaster Drum Sander”

Meet Russell and Beverly Yanney with their Woodmater Drum Sander!

Meet Russell and Beverly Yanney with their Woodmater Drum Sander!

“My wife and I have owned a 50” Woodmaster Drum Sander for 5 years. When you do precision wood working like we do, FLAT is essential.”    — Russell and Beverly Yanney, Green Forest, Arkansas

The Yanneys may have started with no woodworking experience but they certainly have it now. They used their CNC router to carve the Marine Corps logo, "But the wood must be flat first," says Russell. "Getting wood truly flat without the Woodmaster Drum Sander is impossible."

The Yanneys may have started with no woodworking experience but they certainly have it now. They used their CNC router to carve the Marine Corps logo, “But the wood must be flat first,” says Russell. “Getting wood truly flat without the Woodmaster Drum Sander is impossible.”

“My wife, Beverly, and I got started in woodworking in about 2009 when we were renovating a house we purchased. We’re just average Americans, not trained woodworkers. Our backgrounds are in the medical field. We started woodworking from zero and didn’t even know the difference between different types of wood.

Here's a closeup of inlaid lettering. The Yanneys create a perfectly flat surface with their Woodmaster Drum Sander, then use their laser cutter to cut both the letters and the spaces they'll fit into.

Here’s a closeup of the Yanney’s  inlaid lettering skill. The Yanneys create a perfectly flat surface with their Woodmaster Drum Sander, then use their laser cutter to cut both the letters and the spaces they’ll fit into.

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

Building a viable woodworking business

We’re now expanding our scope and developing our work into a viable woodworking business. We already do craft fairs and have a small storefront in our town. My wife is already full time at it and I’m part time. She does the design work and I do the engineering. We’re making custom cedar benches, jewelry boxes, custom chests, fireplace mantles, chopping block tables, and more.

Wildlfe scenes like these are popular among the Yanney's customers. After sanding the wood perfectly flat and smooth with the Woodmaster, they carved this outdoor scene with their CNC router.

Wildlfe scenes like these are popular among the Yanney’s customers. After sanding the wood perfectly flat and smooth with the Woodmaster, they carved this outdoor scene with their CNC router.

We got started with a small planer, a table saw, and a chop saw. One thing led to another and I found a CNC router and a 50-watt laser cutter I couldn’t pass up. That led us to purchase our Woodmaster Drum Sander. The CNC router and the laser cutter have such high precision and low tolerance, the workpiece must be flat.

“Woodmaster holds tolerances to 0.0001 — that’s ONE HUNDRED THOUSANDTHS of an inch!”

Flatness and precision are essential in our work because we work in thousandths of an inch. The Woodmaster Drum Sander holds tolerances to 0.00001 – that’s 100 thousandths of an inch – side to side and end to end. Without our Woodmaster Drum Sander, getting wood flat is just impossible.

A beautiful jewelry box by the Yanneys. Woodmaster created the flat surfaces; their laser cutter created the floral designs.

A beautiful jewelry box by the Yanneys. Woodmaster created the flat surfaces; their laser cutter created the floral designs.

We use the Drum Sander in our inlay work. We sand the workpieces flat with the Woodmaster then use the laser to cut the inlaid pieces and the recesses they fit into. Then we sand the surface flat, even, and smooth with the Woodmaster. We do our bas relief carving work with the CNC router. Here, too, flatness is key and we prepare our workpieces on the Drum Sander.

The Yanneys own a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too.

The Yanneys own a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too.

Quality, versatility, affordability

We actually got an 18” Woodmaster Molder/Planer before the Drum Sander. I chose Woodmaster because it’s American made. I wanted good quality, versatility, and it didn’t cost $10,000 like some machines do.

We’re both perfectionists. When we say ‘perfect’ we mean it and Woodmaster helps us achieve it.

“Write the check”

I’d tell anybody who’s thinking about getting a Woodmaster, ‘Write the check!’ It’s American made, easy to use, and you don’t have to be a mechanic to maintain it. You can definitely make money with a Woodmaster. It does what you ask it to do.”

— Russell Yanney, Woodmaster Drum Sander & Molder Planer Owner, Arkansas

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

TRUE PRECISION ARTISTRY IN WOOD — He makes extraordinary 1,000-piece end grain cutting boards with his Woodmaster Drum Sander

Dennis gave this creation the name "Impossible" because it's impossible for 3-D forms to do what he's made them do. In our view, doing the precision work Dennis does is darn near impossible!

Dennis gave this creation the name “Impossible” because it’s impossible for 3-D forms to do what he’s made them do. In our view, doing the precision work Dennis does is darn near impossible!

Here's Dennis in his show with his 2675 Woodmaster Drum Sander. That's where you'll often find him — some of his creations take 200 hours of shop time. Design time not included!

Here’s Dennis in his show with his 2675 Woodmaster Drum Sander. That’s where you’ll often find him — some of his creations take 200 hours of shop time. Design time not included!

A lot of retired folks just while the days away watching TV. That would never do for dedicated do-it-yourselfers like Woodmaster Owner, Dennis Westphal. “I’d go nuts just sitting around,” he says. Once he made all the furniture his home could hold, he started making his amazing end grain cutting boards. Some are for use in the kitchen but others are made for display. Dennis calls them “decorative cutting boards.” We call them true artistry in wood.

“I’m a retired engineer who’s been doing woodworking for close to 60 years. I spend a lot of time in my shop. I use my Woodmaster Drum Sander almost every day.

Expansion%201[3]

Dennis’s “Expansion” cutting board seems to expand from the center outward but it’s an illusion — it’s actually perfectly flat.

Contraction%202[3]

Dennis’s “Contraction” cutting board appears to bulge in the center and contract at the edges. But this is a clever illusion, too!

Over the years, I’ve built a lot of furniture for our home — china cabinets, tables, TV stands, and more. After awhile, there was no more room. So I started making end grain cutting boards made up of precisely made little pieces of solid wood, all standing on end with the end grain running right straight through from top to bottom.

Thousands of individual pieces — true artistry in wood

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

I give them as gifts — Christmas, weddings, and so on. I make a lot of them, both functional and decorative. The decorative ones are artworks rather than ‘working’ cutting boards. I make all of them with my 26″ Woodmaster Drum Sander.

All are made from end grain cherry, maple, and walnut. Some have over 1,000 individual pieces of wood, some as small as one-quarter inch square.

“Here’s how I make them.”

Here’s how I make them. First, I dream up some kind of pattern. I have a picture in my head of what I want to do, then I lay it out using a CAD program on my computer so I can see what they’re going to look like. The nice thing about CAD drawings is I can modify them easily. Sometimes I make a dozen versions. Then I print out dimension drawings.

Tolerances to ten-thousandths of an inch

I rough-cut wood on my table saw, then put it through my Woodmaster Drum Sander. I can get the wood down to a few thousandths of an inch with my Woodmaster. I can control the thickness to 0.010, that’s ten thousandths of an inch! I really enjoy the Woodmaster Drum Sander for the precision it gives me.

A curved-line design creates the illusion of an undulating surface in one of Mr. Westphal's creations. But it's an illusion -- the surface is flat as a board.

A curved-line design creates the illusion of an undulating surface in one of Mr. Westphal’s creations. But it’s an illusion — the surface is flat as a board.

When the pieces are particularly small, I use double stick tape to attach them to a piece of MDF and I run that through the sander. I tape down and sand as many pieces at one time as I can. When I sand the pieces to size, I take them off.

Then I glue up the pieces. I use Tightbond 3 because it has a long ‘open’ or setup time. I can’t glue very many pieces together at once so I make a series of separate glued-up subsets of maybe 10 blocks at a time, then glue the subsets together.

Projected Cross[2]

Here’s a CAD drawing Dennis sent us – his precision plan for one of his decorative cutting boards…

Westphal finished cross

…and here’s the finished cutting board. Guess Dennis believes in the old saying, “Plan the work and work the plan!” Sure works for him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200 hours work — “And I love doing it.”

Some of my decorative cutting boards take 200 hours of shop time, and that’s not counting design time. And I love doing it. I’m retired, but my brain doesn’t shut off. I’d go nuts if I all I did was sit and watch TV.

“I wanted a machine that would give me the speed and precision I need.”

I got the Woodmaster Drum Sander because I wanted a machine that would give me precision and speed for the kind of work I do. I knew the precision this Drum Sander would give me, and it handles end grain wood more safely than other machines. I did a lot of online research and read reviews and comments from Woodmaster owners. I asked questions and got pretty positive results. I chose the 26” 2675 because it’s big enough to handle any project I’d want to make. After all, I’m not making full-size doors.

Here's Dennis's workshop, neat as a pin with his Woodmaster front and center. He told us his biggest project recently was, "getting my shop cleaned up so I could take photos!"

Here’s Dennis’s workshop, neat as a pin with his Woodmaster front and center. He told us his biggest project recently was, “getting my shop cleaned up so I could take photos!”

That’s what I tell people who ask me about Woodmaster. Think of what you want to use your sander for, what you want to make. Get a machine that’s big enough to handle it. But remember a big drum sander will sand small things but a small drum sander won’t do big things.

I like this Woodmaster Drum Sander. I use it almost every day. I don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t have it. I guess I’d have to get another one! Thanks for the opportunity to show some of my projects to other woodworkers.”

— Dennis Westphal, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, Galva, Kansas

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

EXTREME HOMEBUILDING with a 50” Woodmaster Drum Sander

Home Tour - McCullough 020THIS IS THE HOUSE THAT CHARLES BUILT with help from his 50″ Woodmaster Drum Sander and a 25″ Woodmaster Molder/Planer: almost 18,000 sq. ft. of living space…76 interior doors…4 kitchens…12 bathrooms…7 fireplaces…miles of molding and trim…and more!

The McCullough home seems to be straight out of the English countryside. It's amazing what a serious D-I-Y guy can accomplish!

The McCullough home seems to be straight out of the English countryside. It’s amazing what a serious D-I-Y guy can accomplish!

Charles ran full size doors -- 76 of them! -- through his 50" wide Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Charles ran full size doors — 76 of them! — through his 50″ wide Woodmaster Drum Sander.

For Charles McCullough, home is 13,000 square feet big in the style of an English country home. Throw in a 1,000 square foot guest house and a 3,200 square foot workshop and you’re pushing 18,000 square feet of living space. But besides the sheer size and scale, the remarkable fact is Charles built all this himself. With help, of course, from the best contractors in his area, and his Woodmaster Drum Sander and Molder/Planer. Here’s what Charles emailed us recently when he entered our Drum Sander Photo Contest…

Dear Woodmaster,

Can an entire house be considered a ‘woodworking project?’ It was, for me, the biggest woodworking project I have ever undertaken.

We broke ground for our ‘dream home’ in 2004 and I convinced my wife that she should let me build my dream workshop first so I could make all the interior woodwork for the home right here on site. She bought into that idea so we built a 3,200 square foot workshop, sawmill shed, and dry kiln before starting the 13,000 square foot home.

I bought a new sawmill from TimberKing, a Nyle L200 dry kiln unit, a Woodmaster 725 Molder/Planer with all the options and a boatload of knives, a Woodmaster 5075 Drum Sander, and your Big Max DB500 dust collector.

I hired the best craftsmen this area had to offer. We bought truckloads of logs from the local area and began sawing, drying, and milling lumber. The house has 76 interior doors, four kitchens, around a dozen bathrooms, and miles of crown molding, trim, cabinets, bookshelves, 7 fireplaces (with mantles, of course) and we made it all right here on site.

The project was completed in June, 2007. The home has been featured in “Avenues” magazine, and has been the site for several charitable fundraisers, a couple of weddings, and lots of entertainment.

The Timberking mill and the Woodmaster machines performed very well throughout the construction period. Support from your staff was excellent and prompt throughout and I highly recommend your products to my woodworking friends.

Regards, Charles McCullough

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

Charles tells the rest of his story…

“I’ve always been a ‘wannabe woodworker’ but never had the opportunity to spend the time or money on woodworking. My wife and I had built half a dozen homes in our 43 year marriage. This is the biggest but we were comfortable doing it.

Charles says this outstanding bar was inspired by a bar in Boston. Cheers!

Charles says this outstanding bar was inspired by a bar in Boston. Cheers!

We have three grown children who come up for weekends. We wanted a home big enough to have everybody at once including our grandchildren. My wife and I decided now was a good time to do it.

Biggest & best equipment for this BIG D-I-Y project

I got a TimberKing sawmill to saw trees into lumber. I got the 25” Woodmaster 725 Molder/Planer to dress and size the lumber. I got the 50” 5075 Woodmaster Drum Sander primarily for sending doors – all 76 of them and all the cabinet doors throughout the house. I wanted the biggest and best machines you sell.

LibraryHere's Charles' walnut paneled library. He made the paneling himself with his Woodmasters and saved a bundle.

Here’s Charles’ walnut paneled library. He made the paneling himself with his Woodmasters and saved a bundle.

Our home is 13,000 square feet. The guest house is 1,000 square feet. There are 76 interior doors, four kitchens, and about a dozen bathrooms. There are miles of crown molding, trim, cabinets, and bookshelves. There are seven fireplaces (each with a mantle, of course!).

We’ve been planning and saving blueprints and articles for years. I realized that the millwork I’d need for this home would bust the budget so I build a workshop and stocked it with really good tools including a Woodmaster Drum Sander and a Woodmaster Molder/Planer. I figured making the millwork myself could save enough to pay for the workshop.

The first year, we ran our TimberKing Sawmill and sawed out 200,000 board feet of lumber. We dried 6,000 board feet at a time in our dry kiln and kept it running around the clock for 18 months. We broke ground in 2005, hired the best contractors in our area as I built, and we moved in two and a half years later.

Extraordinary details everywhere you look

The building with the green roof is my workshop. The house itself is styled as an English country home. Outside, its exterior is Arkansas limestone. The beams and curved arches are cypress – there are 36 of them!  Inside there’s a study with walnut paneling. The main kitchen has an island made of black cypress from the Black River Swamp in Black River, Arkansas.

The bar is modeled after a bar in Boston. It’s solid walnut, cabinets and all. The guest house kitchen is made of 100-year-old barn wood from the corn crib from a dairy farm. It’s probably red oak. It’s not stained, I just used tung oil to bring out the natural color.

Foreign machines can’t compare with Woodmaster

Besides his Woodmaster Drum Sander, Charles owns a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, shown here. Between these two tools, he has everything he needs to turn roughcut lumber into finished trim and molding. And that's exactly what he did.

Besides his Woodmaster Drum Sander, Charles owns a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, shown here. Between these two tools, he has everything he needs to turn roughcut lumber into finished trim and molding. And that’s exactly what he did.

I looked at foreign-made equipment but there was nothing to compare with Woodmaster machines. Plus, foreign machines use metric measurements – 9mm, 11mm, and so on. Woodmaster is American made and I’d rather deal with American dimensions like ½”, 3/8”, etc.

Both my Woodmaster Drum Sander and my Molder/Planer have fully variable feed rates. Other machines have just two speeds. This is a very good feature because you can slow it down to a crawl to get an excellent surface.

Commercial duty

I wholeheartedly recommend Woodmaster Drum Sander and Molder/Planer. I have nothing but good things to say about them. I use them as hard as if they’re in a commercial manufacturing environment.”

—  Charles McCullough, Woodmaster Drum Sander & Molder/Planer Owner, Missouri

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

 

ENTER TO WIN our DRUM SANDER PHOTO CONTEST! — Woodmaster Drum Sander Owners ONLY!

Do YOU own a Woodmaster Drum Sander? Then YOU COULD BE A WINNER in our Drum Sander Photo Contest!

PHOTO CONTEST WINNER! Pete Marken's a WINNER in our Drum Sander Photo Contest. His full article -- his photos and story -- is featured on our Drum Sander Blog. YOU could be our next winner!

PHOTO CONTEST WINNER! Pete Marken is a WINNER in our Drum Sander Photo Contest. His full article — his photos and story — is featured on our Drum Sander Blog. YOU could be our next winner!

enter contest

WE’LL WRITE A FEATURE ARTICLE ALL ABOUT YOU!

Donald Accomando says, "My Woodmaster Drum Sander gives me quality results and increases my productivity." Read Donald's Feature Article!

Donald Accomando says, “My Woodmaster Drum Sander gives me quality results and increases my productivity.” Read Donald’s Feature Article!

• As a Winner, we’ll write a FEATURE ARTICLE all about you, your woodworking, and your Woodmaster Drum Sander!

• And we’ll post your article — your story and photos — on our Drum Sander Blog!

• Your story will be read by thousands of woodworkers all across North America and all around the whole world because it’ll be on the Web!

• Having your story and photos posted on our blog gives you great ‘bragging rights’ among your friends and family!

• And if you’re in business, your article on our blog is the best free advertising you can get. Link it to your website, Facebook page, etc!

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

IT’S EASY TO ENTER! Just follow these 4 simple steps:

1. Click red “Enter Photo Contest” box

Ronald Frey says, "It'll snow in Cuba before I'll dress a tabletop by hand!" Read his feature article!

Ronald Frey says, “It’ll snow in Cuba before I’ll dress a tabletop by hand!” Read Ronald’s feature article!

Click one of the “Enter Photo Contest” links (the red boxes) on this page. A blank email addressed to our Editor will appear.

2. Attach your photos

Attach your photos to the email: photos of work you’ve made with your Woodmaster Drum Sander. And please send photos of you, and you with your Woodmaster!

3. Type in a bit of info

Type your name, address, phone number into the email. And jot a few words about you and your woodworking, too!

4. Hit “Send.” That’s it!

Allow a bit of time for us to review and judge all photo contest entries. Be patient, but we WILL respond to every entry!

enter contest

 WANT MORE INFO?   

Charles McCullough says, "I looked at foreign-made equipment but there was nothing to compare with Woodmaster." Read Charles' Feature Article -- coming soon!

Charles McCullough says, “I looked at foreign-made equipment but there was nothing to compare with Woodmaster.” Read Charles’ Feature Article — coming soon!

• Free Info on our Drum Sander Photo Contest – Email Joe at Woodmaster or call him TOLL FREE 1-800-821-665

• Free Info Kit on the Woodmaster Drum Sander – Click Here

• Free Info Kit on the Woodmaster Molder/Planer – Click Here

• Parts and Accessories for Woodmaster equipment — Email Joe or call him TOLL FREE 1-800-821-6651

 

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

“I RUN FULL-SIZE DOORS THROUGH MY 50″ WOODMASTER DRUM SANDER!”

It's a mighty wide drum sander that'll swallow a full sized door whole -- 50" wide to be exact.

It’s a mighty wide drum sander that’ll swallow a full sized door whole — 50″ wide to be exact.

“YOU CAN’T JUST GO DOWN TO HOME DEPOT and buy the building materials I make with my Woodmaster Drum Sander!”

Rick Reese has always worked in wood  but now he’s really taken the plunge, doing all the custom woodworking for his new home. But that’s just a warm up exercise. In a few years he’ll dive into a retirement business making cabinetry and furniture.

Rick and his Woodmaster Drum Sander“I’ve dabbled in woodworking for years but I got real serious a few years ago and I decided to build a new home. I started by building my shop first. It took me two months to plan the shop and the first pieces of equipment I bought were a Woodmaster Drum Sander, a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, and a good table saw.

The house is coming along now. It’s a lodge style timber frame home. It’s pretty rustic with a lot of natural wood and stone. All the trim is knotty alder, all stain grade. You can’t go down to Home Depot and buy the type of building material I’m making with my Woodmasters. My materials have to be perfect and you can’t buy doors and trim of this type and quality. The only way is to make all my building materials myself.

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

Rick's home is coming along nicely thanks to his hard work and his Woodmaster Drum Sander!

Rick’s home is coming along nicely thanks to his hard work and his Woodmaster Drum Sander!

The first things I made for my home were two solid wood pocket doors like the one in the photo. I have 11 more doors to make of knotty alder. I carve designs into both sides using a CNC machine. It guides a small router along three axes: length, width, and depth. It runs software and works like a printer. It’s not as complicated as it sounds.

50” drum sander takes whole doors

I bought your biggest machines, your 25” Woodmaster 725 Molder/Planer and your Woodmaster 5075 Drum Sander. Your sander saves so much time! I run whole doors through it. I had an orbital sander and a hand-held belt sander but your drum sander is so great because you just put wood through it and you’re done. I’m looking at your double-drum sander, the Woodmaster double drum 5075-X2. With two drums, you can put coarse grit paper on the first drum and finer grit paper on the second one.

Rick built this cabinet door then did some mighty fancy bas relief carving work with his CNC routing machine.

Rick built this cabinet door then did some mighty fancy bas relief carving work with his CNC routing machine.

I invested in my shop equipment because tools make the difference. I’m a pretty good woodworker but your tools are better than I am. I couldn’t find better tools than Woodmaster’s. I love them and I’m very happy.

My advice for others who’re thinking of doing what I’m doing is to decide early on your shop layout and the equipment you want to put in it. It took me two months to design my shop. And I’d certainly recommend getting dust collection system. I put in a ceiling-mounted system to save space.

As far as woodworking equipment, I would recommend getting a Woodmaster Drum Sander and Molder/Planer. They’re built like tanks, like American equipment built in the 1940’s. They’re built really well.

Planning his retirement business

I have a few more years to go before I retire from my job as a quality assurance manager in the aerospace industry. When I do retire, I want to go into business building and selling high-end custom cabinets and furniture, built-ins, all solid wood. I have a lot of white oak on hand and I’ll use it to make mission style furniture. It’s quite popular these days.

Thanks, Woodmaster. I couldn’t ask for more. Your machines have save me thousands of dollars and I’m extremely happy. I’ve recommended Woodmaster to neighbors who’ve ended up buying them.”

— Rick Reese, Woodmaster Drum Sander & Molder/Planer owner, Washington State

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!

Jerry has the perfect retirement plan: WOODWORKING WITH HIS WOODMASTER DRUM SANDER

J CEDAR IN MCH FRNT

Recently retired from the aviation industry, Jerry Heater’s got the time now to pursue his lifetime interest in woodworking. “I’m doing woodworking for personal satisfaction, not for money,” he told us. Jerry’s not selling what he makes but he has steady work making home improvements with his Woodmaster. He also has a regular clientele for his work: a couple of grandsons, a great nephew, and the Heater family’s newest addition, their first great grandson.

“Nothing gives me more personal satisfaction than making woodworking projects. I see a knotty, curled-up piece of old barn board and I think, ‘I could really make something beautiful out of that with my Woodmaster Drum Sander.’ Long ago, I read a woodworking article in which the author said he was often asked, ‘What kind of wood is best for woodworking?’ His answer was, ‘The kind of wood you have access to.’  I liked his answer and use this philosophy in my woodworking.

Wedged dowel fastening

No metal fasteners. Look closely and you’ll see Jerry has “pinned” this project together with split dowels and tiny wedges.

Jerry Heater IMG_4582 _sml

Here’s the finished project — a one-of-a-kind cedar baby cradle that’ll surely become a family heirloom. The note on Jerry’s wall says, “Send Help,” but we think he’s got his woodworking very much under control!

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

His woodlot has acres of oak and cedar

My wife and I have 65 acres in the country — her family home place. I have access to a lot of Eastern Red Cedar and Post Oak for the most part here on our place. We had a major fire about four years ago so I have a lot standing dead cedar. 99.9% of what I build is from wood I cut here on our place, though I do use store-bought dowel rods.

I have a TimberKing 1220 band mill, which I use to saw trees into lumber.  Sawing my own lumber with my TimberKing allows for me to get more book-matched wood, but it’s the Woodmaster Drum Sander that makes the finished pieces look like someone who actually knew what they were doing made them!

When finished, Jerry's wedged tenon joints are tight as a drum.

When finished, Jerry’s wedged tenon joints are tight as the bark on a tree.

I’ve taken woodworking classes but I don’t have a history of furniture making so I build what I build until I get it right.  I enjoy making live edge furniture and most of what I do is one-offs, one of a kind.  I use no metal fasteners. I use mortise and wedged tenon combined with wedged wooden dowels.

Older Woodmaster still going strong

I have an older, black 26” Woodmaster model drum sander.  (Editor’s note: new Woodmasters are tan color. We built Jerry’s black machine in 1986 or 1987 — almost 30 years old and still going strong.) Having this machine allows me to use wider wood than I’d tackle if I didn’t have my Woodmaster Drum Sander to sand the surfaces. After all, no woodworker enjoys hand sanding! The wider the work piece, the more hand sanding.

We made Jerry's black Woodmaster in the late 1980's. Today's machines are a handsome tan color.

We made Jerry’s black Woodmaster in the late 1980’s. Today’s machines are a handsome tan color.

What's that mounted on the plaque Jerry made? "That's a kudu. Its one of the critters I harvested when my wife and I went to South Africa back in 2004. The brass on the horns and the bronze on the skull ​is referred to as a cold metal coating. The color is derived solely by the use of ground metal suspended in a acrylic solution. Since it is actual metal - when you apply various acids you get the same patina as the metal would acquire on its own over time."

Hey, Jerry, what’s that mounted on the plaque you made? “That’s a kudu. Its one of the critters I harvested when my wife and I went to South Africa back in 2004. The brass on the horns and the bronze on the skull ​is referred to as a cold metal coating. The color is derived solely by the use of ground metal suspended in a acrylic solution. Since it is actual metal – when you apply various acids you get the same patina as the metal would acquire on its own over time.”

I looked at cantilevered drum sanders — the ones where only one end of the sanding drum is attached to anything. I couldn’t see how that would do a good job. I bought my Woodmaster used. I found it in an advertisement and drove 150 miles to pick it up. I’ve been using it ever since.

Dad always said, “Get the best tools, you’ll never be sorry.”

I wanted a Woodmaster Drum Sander because of its quality construction. My father was a contractor and always told me to get the best tools you can afford and you’ll never be sorry. Woodmaster’s the best — I couldn’t buy a better drum sander.

Yes, mine is an older Woodmaster. Owning one of their new double drum sanders would be a big advantage. But mine has stood up over time. It’s extremely accurate and I’ve done a lot of work with it. I feel I’ve got the best drum sander out there. If someone’s thinking about getting one, I’d say jump into it.

In retirement, I need to stay busy. As I told my wife recently, nothing gives me more personal satisfaction than making the projects I do with my Woodmaster.”

— Jerry Heater, Oklahoma — Woodworker & Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Drum Sanders – sale prices, online specials

SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?

3 WAYS we can help you!