Jerry has the perfect retirement plan: WOODWORKING WITH HIS WOODMASTER DRUM SANDER

J CEDAR IN MCH FRNT

Recently retired from the aviation industry, Jerry Heater’s got the time now to pursue his lifetime interest in woodworking. “I’m doing woodworking for personal satisfaction, not for money,” he told us. Jerry’s not selling what he makes but he has steady work making home improvements with his Woodmaster. He also has a regular clientele for his work: a couple of grandsons, a great nephew, and the Heater family’s newest addition, their first great grandson.

“Nothing gives me more personal satisfaction than making woodworking projects. I see a knotty, curled-up piece of old barn board and I think, ‘I could really make something beautiful out of that with my Woodmaster Drum Sander.’ Long ago, I read a woodworking article in which the author said he was often asked, ‘What kind of wood is best for woodworking?’ His answer was, ‘The kind of wood you have access to.’  I liked his answer and use this philosophy in my woodworking.

Wedged dowel fastening

No metal fasteners. Look closely and you’ll see Jerry has “pinned” this project together with split dowels and tiny wedges.

Jerry Heater IMG_4582 _sml

Here’s the finished project — a one-of-a-kind cedar baby cradle that’ll surely become a family heirloom. The note on Jerry’s wall says, “Send Help,” but we think he’s got his woodworking very much under control!

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His woodlot has acres of oak and cedar

My wife and I have 65 acres in the country — her family home place. I have access to a lot of Eastern Red Cedar and Post Oak for the most part here on our place. We had a major fire about four years ago so I have a lot standing dead cedar. 99.9% of what I build is from wood I cut here on our place, though I do use store-bought dowel rods.

I have a TimberKing 1220 band mill, which I use to saw trees into lumber.  Sawing my own lumber with my TimberKing allows for me to get more book-matched wood, but it’s the Woodmaster Drum Sander that makes the finished pieces look like someone who actually knew what they were doing made them!

When finished, Jerry's wedged tenon joints are tight as a drum.

When finished, Jerry’s wedged tenon joints are tight as the bark on a tree.

I’ve taken woodworking classes but I don’t have a history of furniture making so I build what I build until I get it right.  I enjoy making live edge furniture and most of what I do is one-offs, one of a kind.  I use no metal fasteners. I use mortise and wedged tenon combined with wedged wooden dowels.

Older Woodmaster still going strong

I have an older, black 26” Woodmaster model drum sander.  (Editor’s note: new Woodmasters are tan color. We built Jerry’s black machine in 1986 or 1987 — almost 30 years old and still going strong.) Having this machine allows me to use wider wood than I’d tackle if I didn’t have my Woodmaster Drum Sander to sand the surfaces. After all, no woodworker enjoys hand sanding! The wider the work piece, the more hand sanding.

We made Jerry's black Woodmaster in the late 1980's. Today's machines are a handsome tan color.

We made Jerry’s black Woodmaster in the late 1980’s. Today’s machines are a handsome tan color.

What's that mounted on the plaque Jerry made? "That's a kudu. Its one of the critters I harvested when my wife and I went to South Africa back in 2004. The brass on the horns and the bronze on the skull ​is referred to as a cold metal coating. The color is derived solely by the use of ground metal suspended in a acrylic solution. Since it is actual metal - when you apply various acids you get the same patina as the metal would acquire on its own over time."

Hey, Jerry, what’s that mounted on the plaque you made? “That’s a kudu. Its one of the critters I harvested when my wife and I went to South Africa back in 2004. The brass on the horns and the bronze on the skull ​is referred to as a cold metal coating. The color is derived solely by the use of ground metal suspended in a acrylic solution. Since it is actual metal – when you apply various acids you get the same patina as the metal would acquire on its own over time.”

I looked at cantilevered drum sanders — the ones where only one end of the sanding drum is attached to anything. I couldn’t see how that would do a good job. I bought my Woodmaster used. I found it in an advertisement and drove 150 miles to pick it up. I’ve been using it ever since.

Dad always said, “Get the best tools, you’ll never be sorry.”

I wanted a Woodmaster Drum Sander because of its quality construction. My father was a contractor and always told me to get the best tools you can afford and you’ll never be sorry. Woodmaster’s the best — I couldn’t buy a better drum sander.

Yes, mine is an older Woodmaster. Owning one of their new double drum sanders would be a big advantage. But mine has stood up over time. It’s extremely accurate and I’ve done a lot of work with it. I feel I’ve got the best drum sander out there. If someone’s thinking about getting one, I’d say jump into it.

In retirement, I need to stay busy. As I told my wife recently, nothing gives me more personal satisfaction than making the projects I do with my Woodmaster.”

— Jerry Heater, Oklahoma — Woodworker & Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner

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SEGMENTED WOODTURNING is precision work — so he got a Woodmaster Drum Sander

Pete Marken's "Rising Sun" vase is 9-1/2” diameter X 10-1/2” tall - Woods used: Walnut, Yellowheart, Bloodwood and Holly. 551 pieces of wood

Pete Marken’s “Rising Sun” vase is 9-1/2” diameter X 10-1/2” tall – Woods used: Walnut, Yellowheart, Bloodwood and Holly. 551 pieces of wood

There’s “woodworking,” there’s “precision woodworking” and then there’s PRECISION woodworking. When you’re fitting together close to a thousand pieces of wood in a single project, and working with tolerances as tight as .005 inch, precision is everything. Woodworker, Pete Marken, sent us photos of his remarkable segmented woodturnings and we just had to know how he makes them…and how his Woodmaster Drum Sander helps his process. Here’s Pete’s story….

Pete and his Woodmaster Drum Sander

Vase with Diamonds – 8-1/4” diameter X 9-1/2” tall – woods used: Bubinga, Wenge, Maple and dyed veneers – 571 pieces of wood

Vase with Diamonds – 8-1/4” diameter X 9-1/2” tall – woods used: Bubinga, Wenge, Maple and dyed veneers – 571 pieces of wood

“I started woodturning about 25 years ago and found I really enjoyed it more than any other kind of woodworking. I really got into it. Then, about five years ago, I started doing segmented woodturning.

Segmented woodturning is a really interesting style of woodturning where you assemble dozens or hundreds of wood segments in one project to create unique patterns. In conventional woodturning, you’re turning a solid piece of wood on a lathe. You’re working with one block of one type of wood. I found this was limiting what I could do compared to segmented woodturning.

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870 little pieces of wood

I make my vases and bowls by cutting small segments of wood and gluing them to form rings. I stack and glue the rings, one on another. Then I turn the glued-up piece on my lathe. The challenging part is all the segments and all the rings have to be very precise so everything fits together exactly. If I’m off even two minutes of an arc, I’ll have a gap between segments or rings. (Editor’s note: 2 minutes of an arc equals 0.03 degrees!)

1404

Vase – 11-1/4” diameter X 9” tall – woods used: Cherry, Mahogany, Yellowheart, Wenge and dyed veneer – 870 pieces of wood

The rings with all the design work in them are called ‘feature rings.’ The designs in them have to be cut very precisely, too. One segment may have 20 to 30 or more pieces of wood in it. One of my vases is made of over 870 individual pieces of wood!

I’ve sold my turnings through word of mouth, galleries, and I do custom work, too. Prices for some of my turnings can range up to $1,200 or more depending on complexity of the design and the wood I use. For example, Ebony is very expensive – up to $120 or $140 a board foot.

Woodmaster’s “closed-end” design keeps drum and conveyor belt completely parallel

I bought my Woodmaster 2675 Drum Sander specifically for this work. I use it to clean up boards after I resaw them on my bandsaw. And I use it to make my rings flat and of uniform thickness. Precision is key — I work within five thousandths of an inch, 0.005. (Editor’s note: 0.005 inch, as a fraction, is 1/200 of an inch!)

I did my research and found Woodmaster is more robust, solid, and stable than other sanders. It’s sturdy, good and heavy, and paper changes are easy, too.Click to Learn

“My 26” Woodmaster is a good size for my work and my shop.”

I had other drum sanders but I chose Woodmaster because it’s a ‘closed end’ design, not like cantilevered sanders where one end of the drum is open and not secured. With cantilevered drum sanders, you have issues with the sanding drum not being parallel to the conveyor belt. Then your workpiece ends up being thinner on one side than the other. My Woodmaster’s drum is always level and parallel to the conveyor belt.

Because the drum is held at each end, you can have a wide drum. This 26” machine is a really good size for me, and the machine’s a good size for my shop. I’m happy and I’d tell woodworkers who’re thinking about getting a drum sander to definitely take a look at Woodmaster.”

— Pete Marken, Woodmaster Drum Sander owner, is a member of the Alabama Woodturners Association; the American Association of Woodturners; and the Segmented Woodturners Association.

Visit Pete’s website and his Facebook page.

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Tricks of the Trade — HOW TO VENEER WITH THE WOODMASTER DRUM SANDER

Woodworker, Jose Caubet, is a pro who’s mastered the art of fine veneering. His secret? 30 years of experience and a Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Jose and his Woodmaster Drum Sander

Here’s Jose and his third Woodmaster Drum Sander, a 38″ 3875. He’s moved several times; he sells his used machine instead of moving it — and buys a new one for his new woodworking shop in his new location.

“I’ve been a woodworker for about 30 years. I had a career in construction but at 45 I decided it just wasn’t my thing and I started woodworking. I make fine furniture of choice hardwoods. Among other things, I make and have successfully sold a rocking chair similar to, but different than, the famous Sam Maloof rocking chair.

Jose builds these rocking chairs and has sold them all across the country. They're as comfortable as they are handsome!

Jose builds these rocking chairs and has sold them all across the country. They’re as comfortable as they are handsome!

I don’t do any real advertising; people come to my shop and want specific furniture built. I’ve always run a one-man shop. I’ve resisted hiring people, even when I needed help, because the quality of your work goes down.

Jose’s veneering secrets

I do a lot of veneering and cut my own veneer. With the Woodmaster Drum Sander, I can get thin slabs of veneer down to 1/8” very evenly end-to-end and side-to-side. I sometimes find one or two boards that are really exceptional. I turn them into veneer and make whole tables, all matched, all from the same board, from the same  piece of wood. The drum sander itself is just right for that type of job. It never damages a piece of wood if you do it right. It gives you a very even surface without taking chunks out.

I thickness the wood, then slice it with my band saw, and finish it with the sander. It works like a charm. I’ve been doing it all these years and people are amazed I can get the veneers I can get, so wide and clean.

I run veneer through the Woodmaster several times because I’m not just removing imperfections; I’m thickessing it just where I want it. I thickess the veneer, then I take special glue and glue the veneer to a substrate – a very good plywood with nine or eleven plies, very stable. Then I vacuum the veneer to the substrate. This machine is very accurate. It will give you the same thickness side-to-side and front-to-back. Any difference is absolutely negligible.

Some of the woods I use are very expensive. For example, Hawaiian koa can cost $100 a board foot! When you’re working with very high priced woods, you’re very careful to use every little bit. The Woodmaster helps me eliminate waste.

He’s moved a lot — new Woodmaster each time

I’ve had three Woodmaster drum sanders. I’ve moved a lot and each time I moved, I sold my Woodmaster and got a new one. My first Woodmaster Drum Sander was the 26” 2675. When I moved, I sold it and bought a new one, a 38” double drum Woodmaster sander, 3875-X2. The double drum advantage is you can put different grits on each drum. I used 60 grit on the first drum and 80 grit on the second one.

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This handsome tall table bears the work of fine craftsmanship. Thanks for sharing it, Jose.

This handsome tall table bears the work of fine craftsmanship. Thanks for sharing it, Jose.

When I moved again, I sold that one and bought a 38” single drum Woodmaster drum sander 3875. All Woodmasters use felt between the paper and the drum. This pads the drum and the wood comes out like it’s been sanded by a higher grit paper. For example, when I sand with 80 grit paper, the board looks like it’s been sanded with 100 grit.

Resale value? He got 50% to 70% of original price

Resale value is very good. Each one has been well maintained, clean, and greased. They’re not high-hour, production machines. My first Woodmaster was 15 years old when I sold it and I got 50% of what I paid for it. When I sold my second Woodmaster, it was 12 years old and I got 70% of what I originally paid. I always found woodworkers who were very happy to take my machines off my hands each time I moved. I used what I got for each older Woodmaster to buy the next one.

Made in USA — others aren’t

Part of the reason I chose Woodmaster is it’s made in the United States including the motors. I like I can call the factory and tell them what I need. They pack it up and a few days later I have it. I buy all my sandpaper from Woodmaster. I think it’s very, very good and priced fairly.

One of Jose's moves took him and his woodworking business to Hawaii. While there, he built furniture, of course, and also seven years worth of one-of-a-kind trophies for the Maui Invitation Basket Ball Games.

One of Jose’s moves took him and his woodworking business to Hawaii. While there, he built furniture, of course, and also seven years worth of one-of-a-kind trophies for the Maui Invitation Basket Ball Games.

I looked at Taiwanese machines; General that’s made in Canada; I looked at Powermatic, it’s made in Taiwan now. Woodmaster is American-made, simple, functional, and very easy to use. If anything goes wrong, I call and get technical support. I can take it apart, get the part, put it together, and get it working again. That’s very important to me. I  haven’t had any problems, though.

30 years with Woodmasters, wouldn’t do without one

In my shop, for my kind of work, I wouldn’t be without this drum sander, period. Without the Woodmaster, I’d have to do a lot more work. I’d have to take a planed piece of wood and sand it by hand or with an orbital sander. Woodmaster is a great drum sander. I love the machine! I’ve been using one for over 30 years and I wouldn’t do without one.”

— Jose Caubet, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, Newnan, Georgia

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Master Woodworker says, “I’M NOT IN THIS FOR MONEY — JUST FOR THE LOVE OF WOODWORKING.”

Retired following a successful 30-year business career, Woodmaster Drum Sander owner, Keith Neer teaches woodworking to select students and accepts just four or five furniture commissions a year.

“While at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking, I was admitted into the Michael Fortune Fellowship Program. I made this one-of-a-kind table and chairs from bent laminations of quarter-sawn cherry. Following the bending process, all surfaces were sculpted to the shape you see in the photo.”

“While at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking, I was admitted into the Michael Fortune Fellowship Program. I made this one-of-a-kind table and chairs from bent laminations of quarter-sawn cherry. Following the bending process, all surfaces were sculpted to the shape you see in the photo.”

“43 years ago, I bought an old lathe and tools at a farm sale and proceeded to make some really ugly candleholders as Christmas presents. I’ve been working in wood ever since. About 15 years ago, I began taking professional woodworking classes. Then, about nine years ago, I retired. My wife said, ‘You’ve been talking about becoming a professional woodworker all your life, why not do something about it?’ And I made the move to doing woodworking full time. Not as a business, but as something I love to do.

I built a woodworking shop in an industrial park and planned to have students and do commissioned work. And that’s what I’ve done. In the past nine years, I’ve had 60 or 70 students. Some come with a project in mind. Some come to learn a skill. Some don’t stay long; others, six or eight years. Part of my motivation to teach is I want to spread the word about woodworking. I don’t get hundreds of students but I do try to share what I’ve learned. After all, very little of what I do is my own invention.

Keith Neer, master craftsman and Woodmaster Drum Sander owner, teaches woodworking and produces a limited number of furniture commissions for the pure love of woodworking. He told us recently, “I’m retired. I’m not in this to make money. It’s a pleasure to do woodworking the way I want to at the end of a 30-year career.”

Keith Neer, master craftsman and Woodmaster Drum Sander owner, teaches woodworking and produces a limited number of furniture commissions for the pure love of woodworking. He told us recently, “I’m retired. I’m not in this to make money. It’s a pleasure to do woodworking the way I want to at the end of a 30-year career.” 

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Teaching takes about half my time; building commissioned work takes the other half. I make four or five major pieces of custom furniture a year, all one of a kind. I rarely make the same thing twice. It’s all by word of mouth.

Woodmaster’s precision sanding essential in Keith’s bent lamination process

I do a lot of work with bent lamination. When I make bent elements of furniture, I do it with lamination rather than steam bending. I need to be able to cut something with a bandsaw and be able to sand down to 1/32 of an inch thick without having the sander eat up the piece. There’s no way you can put a piece this thin through a planer.

Keith made this elegant cherry sideboard to match a client's existing dining set.

Keith made this elegant cherry sideboard to match a client’s existing dining set.

Here’s how I do bent lamination. Look at the curved backs of the chairs on my home page and in this blog post. The thickness of the backs, front to back, tapers from about 1-1/2” thick at the bottom to about ¾” thick at the top. Each back is made of 26 glued-up wood strips. And though the thickness of the back varies from the top to bottom, each back has the same number of layers of wood strips from top to bottom. I cut 26 very thin strips of wood, each one tapered thinner at one end than the other. Because each strip is so thin, I can bend it to a curved form and glue it.

To control the taper, I built a jig that held the wood at the angle I wanted for each layer. I used that jig to cut tapered strips on the bandsaw. I used the same jig to guide each strip through the Woodmaster Drum Sander. Each strip is tapered a few thousandths of an inch from top to bottom. You can’t do it this way without the proper jigs and fixtures, or without the right equipment. A sander that can’t hold the tolerances the Woodmaster does would ruin the work I did when I sawed out the pieces on my bandsaw.

Accurate to .0015 (that’s 15 ten-thousandths!) across 38”

I was curious about how much “run-out” there was in the Woodmaster — how much difference in sanding depth between the two ends of the sanding drum. I was dumbfounded to find out the run-out was only .0015 (15 ten-thousandths) of an inch from one end to another! That’s .0015 difference across a 38” wide drum – that’s nothing in the woodworking business! To put it in simple terms, a United States dollar bill is .004 (four thousandths) thick. A dollar bill is three times thicker than the run-out in the Woodmaster!

Woodmaster’s simple, economical design is praiseworthy

A sander is a tool to be used with finesse to take off small amounts of wood with precision. Woodmaster does this at an affordable cost. It was exactly what I needed. As sanders go, the Woodmaster Drum Sander is very economical and has a very simple design. I say that as praise. Heavy industrial equipment like Powermatic® and General International® are heavier, more industrial type machinery and they’re very expensive.

My first Woodmaster Drum Sander was the 26” 2675. A student of mine fell in love with it and I sold it to him! I bought my second one, the 38” 3875, because I wanted to be able to sand wider pieces. The reason I chose Woodmaster is the simplicity of its design. Almost nothing can go wrong, and anything that does go wrong can easily be fixed.

Here's an outstanding Mahogany Fireplace Screen Keith made recently. Careful cutouts are silhouetted by the light behind t he screen.

Here’s an outstanding Mahogany Fireplace Screen Keith made recently. Careful cutouts are silhouetted by the light behind t he screen.

Want a bargain? Go to Pottery Barn. Want an heirloom? Talk to Keith.

My plans for the future? More of what I’ve been doing. I have no intention to change; I’m having too much fun doing what I’m doing. As long as I can build four or five custom pieces a year, and as long as I have students, I’m happy.

Here's a detail of Keith's table, above. Note the precise inlay. Truly a priceless heirloom!

Here’s a detail of Keith’s table, above. Note the precise inlay. Truly a priceless heirloom!

Sometimes people come to me for custom work expecting a bargain because I’m retired. I tell them if they want a bargain, go to Pottery Barn or Ikea for a desk or bookcase or table. My goodness, go buy it with my blessing! I don’t do bookcases or kitchens. Bookcases aren’t any fun to build; cabinetry is great but it doesn’t float my boat and I’m in a position to pretty much do what I want.

I tell people if they want to make an heirloom, or if they want something special like a chair with a curved back, or they want inlay, talk to me because I can do that. My work is going to be different than anybody else’s. If that has value to you, then we can start a relationship.

I’m retired. I’m not in this to make money. It’s a pleasure to do this work the way I want to at the end of a 30-year career. I make enough money in woodworking to support my ‘woodworking habit’ and contribute to health care and vehicles. My ‘habit’ supports itself.”

— Keith Neer, Clermont Woodworking     Craftsman, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner

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“Hello, Woodmaster? I NEED YOUR BIGGEST DOUBLE-DRUM SANDER!”

“I absolutely attribute my business growth to my Woodmaster equipment. So much growth, though, that I needed your BIGGEST double-drum sander!”

Tim & Woodmaster 5075-X2

"This kiosk sits in the center of the Rotunda in our local historic Court House. I made it with Select and Better Red Oak. I made the top perimeter molding with my 718 Woodmaster Molder/Planer."

“This kiosk sits in the center of the Rotunda in our local historic Court House. I made it with Select and Better Red Oak. I made the top perimeter molding with my 718 Woodmaster Molder/Planer.”

Well, quite a few years later, we talked with Tim again and his business is bigger and better than ever. He’s added Woodmaster equipment, he’s got tons more work, higher-end work, and he’s making more money than ever. Here’s what Tim had to say about his business these days…and why he traded up to his brand new 50” Woodmaster Double Drum Sander

“Today, I’m doing a lot more high-end work, and larger projects than before. I make a wide gamut of products, anything from jewelry boxes, to flag display cases, military display cases, medal cases, furniture, wine cabinets, stereo cabinets, kitchen cabinets. I even do custom picture framing. I just made a table with a full set of Windsor chairs. I ship all over the United States. Through all these years, everything I’ve ever built has gone through one of my Woodmasters.

25% growth this year alone

Business is really good. I’m very busy and have a full plate. These days, a lot of people come to us through referrals. We don’t do any real advertising. The work really sells itself. I have started selling online through a third-party website, and that’s been really good. I have my own website, too.

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My work volume has really picked up. I’m working full time and then some! My business income has grown probably 25% just in the last year. This growth has a lot to do with my confidence in my Woodmaster machinery – I can go after high-end work with confidence. If I run something through 

my Woodmasters, I know it’ll come out the way I want. That really builds my confidence, and that helps my business.

warm white lacquered shaker vanity

Tim’s Shaker-style custom vanity has double doors. It’s created using Select and Better northern grown White Birch. The center panels and bottom are birch substrate. It has wooden knobs and concealed Euro hinges. Mortise and tenon joinery throughout.

50” Woodmaster Drum Sander — he traded up from 38” double drum

I had a 38” Woodmaster Double-Drum Sander, but because my business has grown and I’m getting projects that are wider than my 38” sander could handle — like linen closets, pantries, and table tops. I needed a wider drum sander so I figured why not go with Woodmaster’s 50” Double Drum Sander, the 5075-X2. I ordered it with the 10HP motor upgrade.

I love this new 50” drum sander. It’s durable and accurate, and has a digital readout. I send a piece through with the depth set so it’s just touching. I set the sanding depth just where I want it and the result is flat and beautiful.

Sold his 38” for 75% of its purchase price

Coincidentally, Woodmaster gave my name to someone who was thinking about buying a Woodmaster Drum Sander and wanted to see one in person. I showed him my 3875 and put a piece of wood through it. He was impressed and said, ‘You just sold me on Woodmaster Drum Sanders.’ I told him I’d sell him my 3875 and he bought it. I was very happy with the resale value. I got about 75% of my original purchase price, and I put that toward my new 50” drum sander.

Primary & secondary sanding in 1 pass: fast, efficient, professional quality

Most of the time, I do both primary and secondary sanding in one pass. I do my primary sanding with the first drum and the secondary sanding with the second drum. For example, 120-grit paper on the first drum and 180-grit on the second. There’s very little touchup needed.

Variable Feed Rate yields a perfect finish — Reversing Switch saves steps

personalized toy chest

Among the many items Tim makes are customized toy chests like this one. “These are solid wood toy chests, hardwood or softwood, I make to my customers’ specifications. Each has a hinged lids with secure supports.”

The Feed Belt runs at variable speed – I love it, wouldn’t be without it. You can put wood through fast or slow as needed. And the sander’s Reversing Switch is great. A lot of times, I send a workpiece through then hit the Reversing Switch — it brings the board back to you. It saves you steps and it works real nice.

Tim runs 2 Woodmaster Molder/Planers — 1 for molding, 1 for planing

My Woodmaster 718 Molder/Planer is set up as molder. Periodically, I use it for ripping, too. I just used it to make a display kiosk for Mille Lacs County Courthouse. I used the 718 to duplicate old molding used in the late 1800’s.

My Woodmaster 725 Molder/Planer is set up for planing and it runs every day. I buy all my lumber in the rough and plane it to thickness. I installed Woodmaster’s Spiral Cutterhead for planing — I just love it! I’d never go back to using planer blades. The Spiral Cutterhead is awesome. It’s quiet and doesn’t chip wood. I plane thousands of board feet a year. The Spiral Cutterhead stays sharp and just keeps going. I’ve never even rotated the 4-faced cutterheads — I’m still planing with the original faces.

I also have Woodmaster’s biggest double bag dust collection system. It works out real well. I ran 6” pipe throughout shop, all with blast gates regulating the vacuuming to whichever machines are is in use.

“I absolutely attribute my business growth to Woodmaster.”

Tim's Warranty Card

Tim sent in his Warranty Card when he purchased his new 50″ Woodmaster Drum Sander and it got our attention. He wrote, “There is nothing to compare (with a Woodmaster). I currently own several Woodmaster machines. This (50″ drum sander) purchase was an upgrade from my 3875. I also am the proud owner of the 718, 725 & your large double bag dust collector.”

 I can absolutely attribute my business growth to my Woodmaster machines. I couldn’t go after the business I’m getting now without my Woodmasters. I can run figured woods. I can sand perfectly flat with professional quality because of Woodmaster. I’m also able to offer moldings nobody else can because I have access to Woodmaster’s 600 molding knife patterns; custom moldings, too.

Tim built his successful woodworking business from scratch. You can, too.

If you want to get into business and want full confidence that you can produce the products with the quality you want, I highly recommend Woodmaster machines. They’re low maintenance, easy to use, and very accurate. You’ll definitely get your money out of these machines. They will perform over and above what you expect.

My respect for Woodmaster is really high. When it was time to buy another sander, I didn’t go anywhere else. Same thing with my planers – my first was a 718, then I got a 725. If you’re like me, when you own a Woodmaster and it’s time to upgrade, you’ll go with another Woodmaster.”

— Tim Ziegler, Ziegler WoodWork & Specialty, Foreston, MN  —  Woodmaster Drum Sander & Woodmaster Molder/Planer Owner

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“IT’LL SNOW IN CUBA BEFORE I’LL DRESS A TABLETOP BY HAND!” — And with his Woodmaster Drum Sander and Molder/Planer, he’ll never have to!

Long-time cabinetmaker, Ronald Frey, is 82 years young and loves his two Woodmasters. When he sent us some great photos of his outstanding work, we asked him to tell us his whole woodworking story. Here’s what Ronald told us…

Woodworker, Ronald Frey, says he'll never hand-scrape another tabletop by hand. That's why he got his Woodmaster Drum/Sander: wide tabletops come out perfectly flat, smooth, and ready to finish.

Woodworker, Ronald Frey, says he’ll never hand-scrape another tabletop by hand. That’s why he got his Woodmaster Drum/Sander: wide tabletops come out perfectly flat, smooth, and ready to finish.

“You’re obsessed!”

“I’m 82 years young and I don’t do as much as I used to but I’m in my shop every day and I use my Woodmaster Molder/Planer and my Woodmaster Drum Sander a few hours every day. My wife says, ‘You’re obsessed!’

Here's a handsome walnut jewelry cabinet Ronald Frey made with help from his Woodmasters.

Here’s a handsome walnut jewelry cabinet Ronald Frey made with help from his Woodmasters.

I do general cabinetry work. I design 90% of the furniture I make. I build anything people want. Let’s see: dry sinks, stereo cabinets, nightstands, footstools, chests of drawers, headboards, drawing desks, file cabinets, computer desks, cabinet doors, half-doors, drawers, printer stands, anything!

I used to do cabinetry as a business but it’s just a hobby now. I make a lot of things for my church, for friends, and for my kids. Right now, I’m doing a lot of experimental wood turning. I get cherry and walnut, put it on my lathe, and turn goblets. I give them to friends.

A lifelong cabinetmaker & carpenter

When I was in high school, I spent every study period in the shop. Then I went to a trade school and took three years of cabinetry and carpentry. That’s where I learned to do this work. I was an educator for 33 years and taught cabinetmaking at the high school and college levels. But even when I was teaching, I’d be swinging a hammer building houses in the summer.

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“My Woodmasters don’t owe me a dime.”

I built my own home in 1993 and my shop’s in the basement, about 1,800 sq. ft. I have a lot of equipment including both the Woodmaster Molder/Planer and the Woodmaster Drum Sander. Those Woodmasters don’t owe me a dime.

I got the 718 Woodmaster Molder/Planer first. I make a lot of tabletops and I can plane up to 18” wide on that thing. At 82 years old, I refuse to hand-pane and scrape! I buy 95% of my lumber rough. I dress one side, square the edge, and glue up tabletops.

I got the Woodmaster Drum Sander to make tabletops. I’ve made bathroom vanities with my Woodmaster Drum Sander. Kitchen counters, some plastic laminate work, too. It’ll snow in Cuba before I’ll dress a 34” or 36” tabletop by hand!

Frey, George Nakashima Bench, Cherry

Here’s a handsome bench Ronald made of cherry. He says his design was inspired by those of master craftsman, George Nakashima.

I make a lot of projects using both my Woodmaster machines. I made a prayer stand recently. It’s about 17” x 34”. I planed one side, glued it up, put it through my sander, and it’s good to go. Not long ago, I made a 35” wide Shaker table in two sections, each 17-1/2” wide. I ran each through the Woodmaster and glued them together. The joint was absolutely even.

Woodmaster’s simple design is unique

What’s nice about Woodmaster design is it’s simple. Both machines are engineered to be simple and I don’t mean that as a negative. To replace rollers or knives on the Molder/Planer is simple. I can do that in 40 minutes to an hour, max. I just wax the bed of the Woodmaster and it runs well. It’s a beautiful machine.

The Woodmaster Drum Sander’s the same way, that’s what makes it  unique. The drum doesn’t go 90 miles an hour. You can slow it down and it doesn’t burn paper. I can take 10 passes if I need to. I can take off thousandths of an inch at a time. Woodmaster has both single and double-drum sanders. I prefer the 50″ double drum. I can put 80-grit paper on one drum and 100, 120, or 150-grit on the second.

Ronald Frey has a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too. He's owned and used it extensively — we switched from black paint to beige many years ago!

Ronald Frey has a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, too. He’s owned and used it extensively — we switched from black paint to beige many years ago!

American machines, American motors

I love my Woodmasters. If the company made other machines, I’d absolutely buy them in a minute. If they made a Woodmaster table saw of the same quality, I’d buy it. Woodmaster’s been around a long time and they’re made in the USA. They use American motors. If you take care of your Woodmaster, it’ll last forever. You can’t eliminate wear on wearing parts, but if you do your maintenance, it’ll last you a long time. A lot of equipment is made in China and Taiwan — it’s junk. Woodmaster is USA-made and the people there really help you. They take their time with you and they know their stuff. If you have the space for a workshop, consider getting a Woodmaster. Woodmaster, keep up the good work!

Thinking about a Woodmaster? Call Ronald

If anyone’s thinking of getting a Woodmaster, call me. I’d be happy to talk with you about it. I have two Woodmasters and they work beautifully. If something’s wrong, I’ll tell you about it.”

— Ronald Frey, Woodmaster Drum Sander & Molder/Planer Owner, Syracuse NY

(Editor’s Note: Like many Woodmaster owners, Ronald is happy to talk to others about his Woodmasters and promises he’ll “tell it like it is.” If you’d like to talk with Ronald or another of our 100,000+ owners, please call us 1-800-821-6651or email us!)

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“My Woodmaster Drum Sander GIVES ME QUALITY RESULTS & INCREASES MY PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY.”

Woodmaster owner, Donald Accomando, shared his success secret with us recently. “Many woodworkers have the same skills I do,” he told us. “But their equipment doesn’t let them work efficiently so they can’t turn the product out.” Donald’s secret? “Choose equipment that produces high quality results with high efficiency.”

Here's Donald with his 50", double-drum, 5075-X2 Woodmaster Drum Sander. His wife, Janet, stands behind the sander. Donald tells us, "Janet is my Chief Inspector and Quality Control Supervisor!"

Here’s Donald with his 50″, double-drum, 5075-X2 Woodmaster Drum Sander. His wife, Janet, stands behind the sander. Donald tells us, “Janet is my Chief Inspector and Quality Control Supervisor!” Photo by Donald’s former student, Julie Prayer.

“I buy equipment that will make my shop more efficient and I believe dedicated machinery that does one thing perfectly is best. My advice for anyone thinking of getting a drum sander is to get the best you can afford that fits the size of your business.

My main point? I choose the best equipment that helps me turn out quality work with high efficiency. Other cabinetmakers are as good at woodworking as I am but their equipment doesn’t increase their efficiency. So they can’t put the product out. Woodmaster helps me work efficiently.

Here's a spectacular example of Donald's work. "I recently did this complete kitchen," he tells us. "The wood is all Australian Liptus. The homeowner wanted a natural finish to offset the decor of their home. I achieved this by using a 3 ml coat of conversion varnish."

Here’s a spectacular example of Donald’s work. “I recently did this complete kitchen,” he tells us. “The wood is all Australian Liptus. The homeowner wanted a natural finish to offset the decor of their home. I achieved this by using a 3 ml coat of conversion varnish.” Photo by Donald’s former student, Julie Prayer.

30 years with no advertising, no website, not even business cards.

I make custom cabinets, mostly residential, all high quality work. I’ve been doing this for over 30 years and it’s always been fairly steady. My work has been all referral. I don’t advertise and I don’t have a website. I don’t even have business cards. I don’t have to.

Early words of wisdom stuck with him.

When I was in college, I worked in a cabinet shop where I picked up the cabinetmaking trade. It was a good-sized, 40-man production shop that built high end, quality cabinetry. I got a well-rounded education there. Sometimes I’d make drawers, sometimes face frames, always something different. When I left that job, the owner told me, ‘Whatever woodworking you do, always buy the best equipment.’ That’s always struck with me.

I started making cabinetry on my own, and I kept buying better equipment. My first shop was an old garage with an 8’ ceiling which is tough for tall cabinets. The shop I have I have now is over 4,000 sq. ft. The equipment I’ve acquired over the years is pretty much top of the line. It’s a serious shop.

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Donald Accomando has a shop to die for! It's over 4,000 sq. ft. with a high ceiling, and it's packed with top-of-the-line woodworking machinery that gives him excellent results and high maximum working efficiency. His sander? A Woodmaster Drum Sander, of course.

Donald Accomando has a shop to die for! It’s over 4,000 sq. ft. with a high ceiling, and it’s packed with top-of-the-line woodworking machinery that gives him excellent results and high maximum working efficiency. His sander? A Woodmaster Drum Sander, of course. Photo by Donald’s former student, Julie Prayer.

An average new home around here will have 40 to 75 doors in it. I’ll make doors for the kitchen, two or three bathrooms, laundry room, entertainment center, and more — it’s a lot of doors. I buy doors through a custom door company but 90% of the time I make the doors. I have eight shapers that are dedicated to making doors.

Hand-sanders are inefficient tools for finish sanding

When I first started making doors, I used conventional hand-held belt sanders. These were good hand sanders — Porter Cable. But they weren’t efficient tools for that job. You grind down the high spots, air sand the rest, and you’ve ended up sanding multiple times with multiple sanders. To sand that many doors that way would take two guys probably 10 hours. You’d do a lot of hand sanding and you still wouldn’t get the door dead-flat.

Wide belt sanders? Fussy, expensive, “wavy” results.

My first sander was a used vertical wide belt sander with a 30” wide belt. It did an OK job although, unlike the Woodmaster Drum Sander, the pressure on the platen was controlled pneumatically. A lot of times, the panel or door you put through would end up with a bit of wave or ripple to it. There were other little things. It went out of adjustment and it wasn’t wide enough.

I like drum sanders. I had a big vertical belt sander. The giant ones cost three times more than a drum sander. They’re a little faster but the one I had was too small and I was always dicking around with adjustments. It wouldn’t make doors flat. A drum sander – when something goes through it, it comes out flat. Everything that goes through the Woodmaster comes out flat. It just works better. It works every time and you don’t have to fool with it. Price is a consideration, too. At the time I bought, new wide sanders were probably $15,000 – $25,000 and the Woodmaster was under $5,000.

This gorgeous stone-topped kitchen island makes an outstanding focal point in this showcase kitchen. And it makes food preparation convenient, too. Note the fully functional sink. Photo by Donald's former student, Julie Prayer.

This gorgeous stone-topped kitchen island makes an outstanding focal point in this showcase kitchen. And it makes food preparation convenient, too. Note the fully functional sink. Photo by Donald’s former student, Julie Prayer.

Woodmaster: “Everything comes out perfectly flat.”

The next sander I bought was a Custer, similar to the Woodmaster except it was not as heavy. The aluminum drums didn’t have the mass that Woodmaster’s steel drums have. The bed wasn’t as sturdy as Woodmaster’s, either. It was OK, but it just wasn’t heavy enough. So I sold that and got my first Woodmaster Drum Sander — a 38” double-drum 3875-X2 — about 12 to 15 years ago. The only thing I’ve ever replaced is the starter switch. What I liked about the Woodmaster from the get-go is it’s slightly slower than a wide belt, and everything comes out perfectly flat. I could do 75 doors in an hour and a half vs. 10 hours. And the doors come out with more precision.

Occasionally I’ll get 4’ face frames so I bought the 50” double-drum 5075-X2 Woodmaster which I love! It came with a 7-1/2HP motor. It’s a simple machine but everything on it is heavy duty. It’s a better machine: you never have to worry about parts breaking. There are lots of imports that initially look good but just don’t hold up. I still prefer Woodmaster. If I had to buy another one, I would.

“I prefer Woodmaster’s Double Drum Sanders.”

Woodmaster has both single and double drum sanders. I prefer the double drum. I can put 80-grit on one drum and 100, or 120, or 150-grit on the second. You can put different grits on the drums and sand with precision. I have my 5075-X2 set up with 80-grit on the infeed drum and 100 or 120- grit on the outfeed drum. That works for 90% of the work I do — doors, predominantly.

Another thing I like about the Woodmaster is the way the paper fastens to the drum with Velcro®. Other drum sanders have spring-loaded paper tensioners that are difficult to use. With Woodmaster’s system, the paper fits a lot better and changing papers is not a big issue. Woodmaster has an adjustable feed rate that others don’t and the feed-belt is heavier, too. The bearings are heavy, the motor’s heavy.

“Imports just don’t hold up.”

There are so many imports out there that just don’t hold up. For example, I had a 2HP Grizzly® dust collector hooked up to a $12,000 edge bander. The Grizzly® motor failed within a year and the local motor repair guy said he couldn’t fix it for what you’d buy a new one for. So I bought a dust collector from you guys – from Woodmaster. That motor has worked for 15 years.

An outstanding kitchen like this one deserves more than the traditional lazy susan in the corner. Donald has maximized storage space while creating a unique and outstanding corner storage solution with angled drawer faces.

An outstanding kitchen like this one deserves more than the traditional lazy susan in the corner. Donald has maximized storage space while creating a unique and space saving corner storage solution with angled drawer faces. Photo by Donald’s former student, Julie Prayer.

Price/Value Relationship

I’d look at Woodmaster first. It’s a real good value. Take Performax® sanders for example. They’re $2,500 and they’re just a big arm with a sanding head on it. They say you can sand half the width of your workpiece, then flip it around and do the other half. That doesn’t work that well. For a little more money, you can buy a real drum sander that’ll do the job well. Woodmaster just flat out works.

Most of my equipment is from Austria, Germany, or Italy. But I’d never buy any drum sander other than Woodmaster. In my experience, the Woodmaster Drum Sander does what it’s supposed to do and you don’t have to fool around with it. You can buy a wide belt but a wide belt the same size as the Woodmaster Drum Sander I have would cost you at least $25,000. Then you need the power to run its 10 or 15HP motor. Or you can pay $6,000 for a Woodmaster. It holds up and works better.

“The guys I talk to at Woodmaster build the machines.”

From a service point of view, Woodmaster’s great. Anybody you talk to there, they know their machines. Whatever I need to be satisfied, they do it. I wanted a longer power cord; they just did it for me. Other companies would say, ‘You’ve got to do that yourself’ and blah blah blah. I’ve talked to other salespeople for other products and, basically, they’re just reading the brochures. The guys I talk to at Woodmaster actually build the machines.

Simple & dependable

I like quality machinery and that drum sander is the heart of all my finish work. It has to be dependable and Woodmaster is. The edge bander I have is the most complicated machine I’ve ever had. It has probably 15 micro-switches in it. To have it serviced costs $2,000. I don’t have that problem with my Woodmaster Drum Sander!”

— Donald Accomando, Cabinet Maker, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner, McArthur CA

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HUGE SLABS of wood call for one MIGHTY BIG DRUM SANDER — 50″ BIG!

30 years of professional logging taught Mark Abernathy unique skills when it comes to making his one-of-a-kind rustic furniture: he knows where to go and how to get the BIG ONES – the old growth trees he needs to do this kind of woodworking. He cuts his own, and he uses every inch of his 50” wide Woodmaster Drum Sander!

 

Logger-turned-woodworker, Mark Abernathy, turns a single slab of wood into a handsome, rustic tabletop with his 50″ Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Logger-turned-woodworker, Mark Abernathy, turns a single slab of wood into a handsome, rustic tabletop with his 50″ Woodmaster Drum Sander.

 

“I make rustic furniture from big slabs of wood. I do a lot with big maple burl wood slabs. Some of those are even up to 6’ diameter. I crosscut slabs several inches thick so I get big rounds of wood. I do this work on my 50” Woodmaster Drum Sander. It’s been a tremendous help; I just wish Woodmaster would make a 60” drum sander!

“I had no experience making rustic furniture.”

I logged for 30 years. I had my own operation out on the West Coast near Mt. St. Helens. At one time I had 70 employees. I cut furniture grade wood, mostly lodge pole pine. We’d turn it on a big doweling machine for woodworkers in California and Arizona. I’d take wood around and see what they were doing and I finally realized I could do it as well as they could. I hadn’t had any experience making rustic furniture but it wasn’t paying off to take wood around and sell some here and there. I started making lamps and coat racks, then I got into beds, dressers, and tables.

Sanding was such a huge ordeal that I asked a cabinetmaker friend of mine if he knew anything about the Woodmaster Drum Sander. He said, ‘I sure do, I loved it so well I bought one.’ That’s how I ended up getting one. Instead of the smaller 26” or 38” one, I’d get the biggest 50” one. This sander makes production ever so much easier. My chainsaw comes first, then this big sander.

This prize slab is so big we almost couldn't get Mark in the photo. Is it destined to be a bar top? A coffee table? Either one would be amazingly striking.

This prize slab is so big we almost couldn’t get Mark in the photo. Is it destined to be a bar top? A coffee table? Either one would be amazingly striking.

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“You can cut a lot of wood with a 48” chainsaw.”

My expertise from my logging experience is going out and getting wood. That gives me a little edge over a lot of people. I cut my own wood; occasionally I’ll buy something. I’ve been making rustic furniture for 17 years now. I’ve got a pretty good feel for what to look for.

I’ve got chainsaws with a 4’ bar, a 42” bar, and a 32” bar. With 48” you can cut a lot of wood. Crosscutting a log that’s wider than your bar takes a lot of experience and you have to have a good sharp chain. You cut down through one side and go around and follow the first kerf as best you can. The ripping I do is the same thing. I eyeball it. You get used to it.

I cut my own wood from private ranches. One ranch has 30,000 acres and a lot of juniper. Another ranch owner asked me, ‘Can’t you take it all?’ That would be 300 log trucks! Another ranch has 80,000 acres with juniper. Ranchers are glad to get rid of the wood. They want grassland.

Mark does mostly custom work. He finds it's best to let customers choose the wood he'll use to make their custom furniture. There's plenty to choose from in Mark's shop and every single piece is unique.

Mark does mostly custom work. He finds it’s best to let customers choose the wood he’ll use to make their custom furniture. There’s plenty to choose from in Mark’s shop and every single piece is unique.

Custom work – let customers choose their own wood.

We have a rustic furniture storefront and a sign out front on US Highway 93 in Kalispell. I’ve found through the years people like to come in and pick out their own wood. I let them come in and shop. I have nothing to hide. I want them to see what I’ve got. I’ve got some furniture made ahead but pretty near all my work is custom.

Most of the wood I work with goes through the sander. All the slabs go through. I’m making tables, bedroom sets, dressers, night stands, living room furniture, and tables. I also do some cabinetry – islands and bars and all that goes through the sander. I’ve put 30,000 board feet through the Woodmaster – maybe more.

“As fast as a wide belt sander and does just as good a job.”

Here’s another thing people should know: I’ve put wood through wide belt sanders – they’re big, expensive, vertical sanders. They don’t do any better job than this Woodmaster. I’ve used both and this Woodmaster is so simple and good I wouldn’t want to go any other route. The Woodmaster is simple. When you wear out a wrap of sandpaper, you just wrap another one on and go ahead. I can sand as fast as one of those wide belt sanders and I know this one does just as good a job.

If someone’s thinking about getting a Woodmaster, I’d definitely advise them to get one. Depending on what they’re doing, I’d recommend this big 50” one. It’s big enough I can run two grit sandpapers side by side at the same time. I do that a lot, have two grits on at the same time – half and half, up to 2 feet each. It works great. It saves time. Sometimes I even run 3 grits at the same time. Just tell Woodmaster they ought to come up with a bigger drum sander!

— Mark Abernathy, Rustic Log Creations Montana, Kalispell Montana

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WOODWORKER REINVENTS HIS BUSINESS – SURVIVES & THRIVES IN TODAY’S ECONOMY — A Pro Cabinetmaker & Vietnam Vet shares his hard-won experience

Dante puts his 50" Woodmaster Drum Sander through it's paces. He's making a good living as a cabinetmaker in today's tough economy. Woodmaster helps by slashing his operating costs.

Dante puts his 50″ Woodmaster Drum Sander through it’s paces. He’s making a good living as a cabinetmaker in today’s tough economy. Woodmaster helps by slashing his operating costs.

LIKE THE OLD SAYING, “WHEN THE GOING GETS TOUGH, THE TOUGH GET GOING,” HERE’S ONE WOODMASTER WOODWORKER WHO DID JUST THAT. FACED WITH THE CHALLENGES OF TODAY’S ECONOMY, HE RETOOLED AND RESTRUCTURED HIS BUSINESS. AND TODAY’S BUSINESS IS GOOD.

“Even in today’s economy, people are making a good living in woodworking and Woodmaster makes it possible with the right size and scale equipment.

Wide belt performance for a fraction of the oost

Woodmaster Drum Sanders may seem big to the average woodworker but I’ve used the biggest and best equipment there is so Woodmaster seems compact to me. But the end product is just as good as big, industrial equipment. It takes a bit longer on a Woodmaster than on a $100,000 machine but the savings in the cost of the equipment are well worth it.

At my business’s peak, we were the largest custom cabinetmaker in Rhode Island, manufacturing case goods (cabinetry) for Dunkin’ Donuts, Starbucks Coffee, and Honey Dew Donuts. My first sander was an industrial 37” Timesaver wide belt sander. Within a year, we needed to go to 3-head 53” wide belt sander.

He reduced costs while maintaining quality

With the onset of the current recession, we saw a decline in orders from those companies. We employed 40 people at our peak. Starting in 2007 we reduced employment to 6. We started getting back into custom kitchen cabinetry, still using the 3-head Timesaver. But just turning on the Timesaver for 20 minutes incurred a electric service and distribution charge of over $600!

That’s when I went to Woodmaster. It’s 500% cheaper to run. It runs on a 480V 3-phase motor and uses fewer amps. No air compressor, just a 3HP dust collector. My cost savings are 99%.

I’m 110% satisfied with the Woodmaster Drum Sander and its operating cost is 99% less. It doesn’t cost $100 a belt like the Timesaver does. I don’t have to fire up 100 HP worth of motors to run a single piece through. I don’t have to run a 20HP dust collection system. I don’t have to run an industrial compressor like I needed for the Timesaver. The Woodmaster is low monetary cost to begin with, low maintenance, and low operating cost.

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I’m very happy. With a 50” Woodmaster, I can have 4 grits on the machine at same time, 1-foot wide each. Most raised panel doors are 24” wide so you could run two grits side by side if you wanted. Or I can run a 48” wide table through it. I run 100 grit on first head, 150 grit on second head.

Dante's a Vietnam Vet who's newest enterprise is dedicated to building affordable, green housing for veterans and their families.

Dante’s a Vietnam Vet who’s newest enterprise is dedicated to building affordable, green housing for veterans and their families.

Skilled workforce available

Because of the economy there are highly skilled people out of work. I bring in part time people, especially disabled vets. With the onset of Heroes Village, I’m going to give disabled vets and disabled civilians an opportunity to learn and work for a living in spite of their disabilities. I am in the process of starting a 501c3 company, Hope for Heroes, to assist both disabled vets and non-vets learn the woodworking trade in a classroom atmosphere, to prepared them for employment. (See Danté’s biography, A Man on a Mission, below.)

I have no reason to fluff this story up. The Woodmaster company has far exceeded my expectations on service, sales, and everything else. I’ve bought over a million and a half dollars worth of equipment in my career and I’m amazed at what the Woodmaster will do if you keep it within its capabilities. I’ll put Woodmaster machine up against any industrial machine in the world. It’s easy to run, uncomplicated, safe, good equipment.

“I’d tell anybody…”

I’d tell anybody considering a sander, ‘Don’t look anywhere else but Woodmaster. Save yourself time and aggravation — I’ve done the research.’ Woodmaster is an accommodating, considerate company. I have nothing but good things to say about them. My phone calls are returned, there’s no ‘press 1 for service’ like with big companies.

If anybody deserves the Congressional Medal of Honor for helping small businesses it’s Woodmaster because they go above and beyond the call of duty dealing with customers. They really keep the little guy happy. They’re an American company that assists businesses. Thank God for Woodmaster!”

Dante’s survival philosophy

“In 42 years as a professional cabinetmaker, I’ve had the best of the best equipment, the biggest of the big. Today I have Woodmaster because it fits today’s woodworking economy. I have absolutely no regrets.”

— Danté Grassi, CT Cabinetmaker, Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner

Danté Grassi…a man on a mission

Danté Grassi is a master craftsman who began his cabinetmaking and manufacturing career in 1973 for national and international clients including Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts. Mr. Grassi is a graduate of both Northeastern and Johnson and Wales University. He served in Vietnam in 1968 through 1969 and is actively involved in veterans affairs, serving on the Advisory Board of ConnectVets and as Construction Manager of Heroes Village, a series of communities planned to offer affordable green housing for veterans and their families.

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“If I didn’t have a wife already, I’D MARRY MY WOODMASTER DRUM SANDER!”

Bruce runs a blank through his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. He got it to make picture frame stock. He orders custom pattern knives from Woodmaster to reproduce antique patterns that haven't been produced in 150 years.

Bruce runs a blank through his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. He got it to make picture frame stock. He orders custom pattern knives from Woodmaster to reproduce antique patterns that haven’t been made in 150 years.

Woodmaster owners are often fiercely enthusiastic about their machines. Bruce Bell, owner of Double Dragon Woodworks in San Francisco, sums up the loyalty many feel when he jokes he’d marry his Woodmaster if he wasn’t already wed.

Bruce makes light of his love for his Woodmaster but he’s extremely serious about his work as you’ll see in the photos below. We at Woodmaster couldn’t ask for more than happy, highly talented customers like Bruce who LOVE their machines!

Bruce tells his Woodmaster story…

Bruce's Potting Bench is made of Western Red Cedar. On the bench top is one of his octagonal planters.

Bruce’s Potting Bench is made of Western Red Cedar. On the bench top is one of his octagonal planters.

“I have my own business manufacturing outdoor furniture, garden structures like pergolas and ground-level decks. I work with landscape architects. I build planters and boxes of teak, mahogany, and red cedar. I build them like fine furniture. I guarantee them to last a lifetime and I price them accordingly.

Here’s how my woodworking business got started: I made some planters for my wife and the neighbors saw them. They wanted one and pretty soon I said to myself, “I thought I retired, now I’m working for a living again!”

Here's Bruce's "Double Dragon Woodworks" business logo made of inlaid veneer.

Here’s Bruce’s “Double Dragon Woodworks” business logo made of inlaid veneer.

 

 

 

 

 

Increased production 20 times over — paid for itself in a week

I got a Woodmaster Drum Sander and it has improved my productivity. I can’t say enough good things about it. If I didn’t have a wife already, I’d marry my Woodmaster Drum Sander!

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I’ve never had a bit of trouble with it. If I had to sand my planter boxes by hand, even with a DeWalt® Orbital Sander, it would take me a day just to make one box. Now I can make a dozen boxes in a day. I can sand a month’s worth of panels in a day.

My Woodmaster paid for itself in maybe a week and that’s not an exaggeration. I went from making one box a week to maybe 20 or 30. They retail for $250 and up.

Bruce's Hall/Entry table is made of birdseye maple and walnut. It measures 34" H x 67" L x 16" W.

Bruce’s Hall/Entry table is made of birdseye maple and walnut. It measures 34″ H x 67″ L x 16″ W.

Comparable quality costs over $10,000

Why’d I choose a Woodmaster? Price, really. I did a lot of research. I couldn’t find any under $10.000. I had used a 60″-wide belt sander but that was $80,000. I read about the Performax® Drum Sander but I didn’t like those because they’re cantilevered: they have an open end.

Bruce Bell credits his Woodmaster Drum Sander with boosting his production speed from 1 planter box a day to 10 or 12. At $250 apiece and up, an increase like that puts some serious money in the bank.

Bruce Bell credits his Woodmaster Drum Sander with boosting his production speed from 1 planter box a day to 10 or 12. At $250 apiece and up, an increase like that puts some serious money in the bank.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m not buying any made-in-China imports. There’s a reason why they’re cheap: low labor costs and they don’t put that much into it. When you’re running production, you don’t want plastic parts.

He got a Woodmaster Molder/Planer to make picture frames

I bought a Woodmaster Molder/Planer to use as a molder. I’ve already bought half a dozen custom knives from Woodmaster. One of my good friends is an antique dealer who deals mainly in prints. He told me that if I could make molding for picture frames he’d give me a lot of work.

He gets some old prints where one side of the frame is split or cracked, but hte customer really likes the frame and they haven’t made that kind of molding in 150 years. I take a section of the frame, send it to Woodmaster, and then make me a custom knife. Then I repair the old frame.

 

 

Making a $40,000 entertainment center

Woodmaster has improved my productivity. I can’t say enough good things about it, especially the sander. Right now I’m working on this huge entertainment center — it’s a $40,000 project. It’s all made out of cherry and maple with veneers that I laid up myself. I put the veneers on and send them through the sander to get them all thicknessed. It has 50 or 60 square feet of veneer, all small pieces. I sliced them on my band saw, then I had to sand them so they were all uniform thickness. I could do it really easily and everything was the same thickness when I glued it all down. Everything was flat, no ripples. That Woodmaster machine is incredible.

Customer service? Stellar.

Woodmaster’s customer service is stellar — I’m not kidding. Those guys go above and beyond the call of duty. They’re so over the top, I wish I could buy cars from Woodmaster! My advice to anybody looking at Woodmaster: don’t think about it, just go buy one.”

— Bruce Bell, Double Dragon Woodworks, San Francisco CA

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SAVE BIG NOW on Woodmaster Molder/Planers – sale prices, online specials

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